Dendritic Versus Tumor Cell Presentation of Autologous Tumor Antigens for Active Specific Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma

Impact on Long-Term Survival by Extent of Disease at the Time of Treatment

Robert O. Dillman, Edward F. McClay, Neil M. Barth, Thomas T. Amatruda, Lee Schwartzberg, Khosrow Mahdavi, Cristina De Leon, Robin E. Ellis, Carol Depriest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In patients with metastatic melanoma, sequential single-arm and randomized phase II trials with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with antigens from self-renewing, proliferating, irradiated autologous tumor cells (DC-TC) showed superior survival compared with similar patients immunized with irradiated tumor cells (TC). We wished to determine whether this difference was evident in cohorts who at the time of treatment had (1) no evidence of disease (NED) or (2) had detectable disease. Eligibility criteria and treatment schedules were the same for all three trials. Pooled data confirmed that overall survival (OS) was longer in 72 patients treated with DC-TC compared with 71 patients treated with TC (median OS 60 versus 22 months; 5-year OS 51% versus 32%, p=0.004). Treatment with DC-TC was associated with longer OS in both cohorts. Among 70 patients who were NED at the time that treatment was started, OS was better for DC-TC: 5-year OS 73% versus 43% (p=0.015). Among 73 patients who had detectable metastases, OS was better for DC-TC: median 38.8 months versus 14.7 months, 5-year OS 33% versus 20% (p=0.025). This approach is promising as an adjunct to other therapies in patients who have had metastatic melanoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-194
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Active Immunotherapy
Autoantigens
Neoplasm Antigens
Melanoma
Dendritic Cells
Survival
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Appointments and Schedules
Vaccines
Neoplasm Metastasis
Antigens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Pharmacology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Dendritic Versus Tumor Cell Presentation of Autologous Tumor Antigens for Active Specific Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma : Impact on Long-Term Survival by Extent of Disease at the Time of Treatment. / Dillman, Robert O.; McClay, Edward F.; Barth, Neil M.; Amatruda, Thomas T.; Schwartzberg, Lee; Mahdavi, Khosrow; De Leon, Cristina; Ellis, Robin E.; Depriest, Carol.

In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, Vol. 30, No. 5, 01.06.2015, p. 187-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dillman, Robert O. ; McClay, Edward F. ; Barth, Neil M. ; Amatruda, Thomas T. ; Schwartzberg, Lee ; Mahdavi, Khosrow ; De Leon, Cristina ; Ellis, Robin E. ; Depriest, Carol. / Dendritic Versus Tumor Cell Presentation of Autologous Tumor Antigens for Active Specific Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma : Impact on Long-Term Survival by Extent of Disease at the Time of Treatment. In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 187-194.
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