Dental demineralization and caries in patients with head and neck cancer

Jie Deng, Leanne Jackson, Joel B. Epstein, Cesar Migliorati, Barbara A. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary Concurrent chemoradiation (CCR) therapy is a standard treatment for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). It is well documented that CCR causes profound acute and late toxicities. Xerostomia (the symptom of dry mouth) and hyposalivation (decreased salivary flow) are among the most common treatment side effects in this cohort of patients during and following treatment. They are the result of radiation-induced damage to the salivary glands. Patients with chronic hyposalivation are at risk for demineralization and dental cavitation (dental caries), often presenting as a severe form of rapidly developing decay that results in loss of dentition. Usual post-radiation oral care which includes the use of fluoride, may decrease, but does not eliminate dental caries associated with radiation-induced hyposalivation. The authors conducted a narrative literature review regarding dental caries in HNC population based on MEDLINE, PubMed, CLNAHL, Cochrane database, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from 1985 to 2014. Primary search terms included head and/or neck cancer, dental caries, dental decay, risk factor, physical symptom, physical sequellea, body image, quality of life, measurement, assessment, cost, prevention, and treatment. The authors also reviewed information from National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), American Dental Association (ADA), and other related healthcare professional association web sites. This literature review focuses on critical issues related to dental caries in patients with HNC: potential mechanisms and contributing factors, clinical assessment, physical sequellea, negative impact on body image and quality of life, potential preventative strategies, and recommendations for practice and research in this area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3258
Pages (from-to)824-831
Number of pages8
JournalOral Oncology
Volume51
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Tooth Demineralization
Dental Caries
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Xerostomia
Body Image
Radiation
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (U.S.)
American Dental Association
Quality of Life
Cohort Effect
Dentition
Therapeutics
Salivary Glands
Fluorides
PubMed
MEDLINE
Health Care Costs
Mouth
Tooth
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Deng, J., Jackson, L., Epstein, J. B., Migliorati, C., & Murphy, B. A. (2015). Dental demineralization and caries in patients with head and neck cancer. Oral Oncology, 51(9), 824-831. [3258]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2015.06.009

Dental demineralization and caries in patients with head and neck cancer. / Deng, Jie; Jackson, Leanne; Epstein, Joel B.; Migliorati, Cesar; Murphy, Barbara A.

In: Oral Oncology, Vol. 51, No. 9, 3258, 01.09.2015, p. 824-831.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Deng, J, Jackson, L, Epstein, JB, Migliorati, C & Murphy, BA 2015, 'Dental demineralization and caries in patients with head and neck cancer', Oral Oncology, vol. 51, no. 9, 3258, pp. 824-831. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2015.06.009
Deng J, Jackson L, Epstein JB, Migliorati C, Murphy BA. Dental demineralization and caries in patients with head and neck cancer. Oral Oncology. 2015 Sep 1;51(9):824-831. 3258. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2015.06.009
Deng, Jie ; Jackson, Leanne ; Epstein, Joel B. ; Migliorati, Cesar ; Murphy, Barbara A. / Dental demineralization and caries in patients with head and neck cancer. In: Oral Oncology. 2015 ; Vol. 51, No. 9. pp. 824-831.
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