Dental pulp stem cells for the study of neurogenetic disorders

A. Kaitlyn Victor, Lawrence Reiter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are a relatively new alternative stem cell source for the study of neurogenetic disorders. DPSC can be obtained non-invasively and collected from long-distances remaining viable during transportation. These highly proliferative cells express stem cell markers and retain the ability to differentiate down multiple cell lineages including chondrocytes, adipocytes, osteoblasts, and multiple neuronal cell types. The neural crest origin of DPSC makes them a useful source of primary cells for modeling neurological disorders at the molecular level. In this brief review, we will discuss recent developments in DPSC research that highlight the molecular etiology of DPSC derived neurons and how they may contribute to our understanding of neurogenetic disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R166-R171
JournalHuman molecular genetics
Volume26
Issue numberR2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Dental Pulp
Stem Cells
Stem Cell Research
Neural Crest
Cell Lineage
Chondrocytes
Nervous System Diseases
Osteoblasts
Adipocytes
Neurons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Dental pulp stem cells for the study of neurogenetic disorders. / Victor, A. Kaitlyn; Reiter, Lawrence.

In: Human molecular genetics, Vol. 26, No. R2, 01.10.2017, p. R166-R171.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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