Department of veterans affairs single-drug therapy of hypertension study. Revised figures and new data

Barry J. Materson, Domenic J. Reda, William Cushman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The antihypertensive efficacy of six drugs and placebo was compared in 1292 men with untreated diastolic blood pressure of 95 to 109 mm Hg. The primary end point "success" was defined as the patient having achieved a diastolic blood pressure of <90 mm Hg at the end of the drug titration period and having maintained a diastolic blood pressure of <95 mm Hg for 1 year without drug intolerance. The original published success rate data (N Engl J Med 1993; 328: 914-921) were discovered to be in error due to a computer programming code omission (N Engl J Med 1994; 330: 1689). This paper presents corrected graphic figures. The corrected success rates were generally higher than originally published. Overall, diltiazem (72%) was significantly higher than hydrochlorothiazide (55%), prazosin (54%), captopril (50%), and placebo (31%); clonidine (62%) and atenolol (60%) were intermediate. There were some changes in the hierarchy of drug response, but important differences in success rates according to age by race subgroups remained. Whites responded well to all drug classes, except for lower efficacy of hydrochlorothiazide in younger whites. Blacks responded better to diltiazem than other agents. In addition, we have analyzed the data using a definition of success based on <90 mm Hg for 1 year. Use of the <90 mm Hg criterion reduced the rate of success, but had only a minor effect on the drug success rate hierarchy. We conclude that single-drug antihypertensive therapy is effective in a majority of stage 1 to 2 diastolic hypertensive patients, although there are important age-by-race differences in success rates among various drug classes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-192
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Veterans
Hypertension
Drug Therapy
Blood Pressure
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Hydrochlorothiazide
Diltiazem
Placebos
Atenolol
Prazosin
Captopril
Clonidine
Antihypertensive Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Department of veterans affairs single-drug therapy of hypertension study. Revised figures and new data. / Materson, Barry J.; Reda, Domenic J.; Cushman, William.

In: American Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 189-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{558053346fa14ddf85cc38784325e51f,
title = "Department of veterans affairs single-drug therapy of hypertension study. Revised figures and new data",
abstract = "The antihypertensive efficacy of six drugs and placebo was compared in 1292 men with untreated diastolic blood pressure of 95 to 109 mm Hg. The primary end point {"}success{"} was defined as the patient having achieved a diastolic blood pressure of <90 mm Hg at the end of the drug titration period and having maintained a diastolic blood pressure of <95 mm Hg for 1 year without drug intolerance. The original published success rate data (N Engl J Med 1993; 328: 914-921) were discovered to be in error due to a computer programming code omission (N Engl J Med 1994; 330: 1689). This paper presents corrected graphic figures. The corrected success rates were generally higher than originally published. Overall, diltiazem (72{\%}) was significantly higher than hydrochlorothiazide (55{\%}), prazosin (54{\%}), captopril (50{\%}), and placebo (31{\%}); clonidine (62{\%}) and atenolol (60{\%}) were intermediate. There were some changes in the hierarchy of drug response, but important differences in success rates according to age by race subgroups remained. Whites responded well to all drug classes, except for lower efficacy of hydrochlorothiazide in younger whites. Blacks responded better to diltiazem than other agents. In addition, we have analyzed the data using a definition of success based on <90 mm Hg for 1 year. Use of the <90 mm Hg criterion reduced the rate of success, but had only a minor effect on the drug success rate hierarchy. We conclude that single-drug antihypertensive therapy is effective in a majority of stage 1 to 2 diastolic hypertensive patients, although there are important age-by-race differences in success rates among various drug classes.",
author = "Materson, {Barry J.} and Reda, {Domenic J.} and William Cushman",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0895-7061(94)00196-I",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "189--192",
journal = "American Journal of Hypertension",
issn = "0895-7061",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Department of veterans affairs single-drug therapy of hypertension study. Revised figures and new data

AU - Materson, Barry J.

AU - Reda, Domenic J.

AU - Cushman, William

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - The antihypertensive efficacy of six drugs and placebo was compared in 1292 men with untreated diastolic blood pressure of 95 to 109 mm Hg. The primary end point "success" was defined as the patient having achieved a diastolic blood pressure of <90 mm Hg at the end of the drug titration period and having maintained a diastolic blood pressure of <95 mm Hg for 1 year without drug intolerance. The original published success rate data (N Engl J Med 1993; 328: 914-921) were discovered to be in error due to a computer programming code omission (N Engl J Med 1994; 330: 1689). This paper presents corrected graphic figures. The corrected success rates were generally higher than originally published. Overall, diltiazem (72%) was significantly higher than hydrochlorothiazide (55%), prazosin (54%), captopril (50%), and placebo (31%); clonidine (62%) and atenolol (60%) were intermediate. There were some changes in the hierarchy of drug response, but important differences in success rates according to age by race subgroups remained. Whites responded well to all drug classes, except for lower efficacy of hydrochlorothiazide in younger whites. Blacks responded better to diltiazem than other agents. In addition, we have analyzed the data using a definition of success based on <90 mm Hg for 1 year. Use of the <90 mm Hg criterion reduced the rate of success, but had only a minor effect on the drug success rate hierarchy. We conclude that single-drug antihypertensive therapy is effective in a majority of stage 1 to 2 diastolic hypertensive patients, although there are important age-by-race differences in success rates among various drug classes.

AB - The antihypertensive efficacy of six drugs and placebo was compared in 1292 men with untreated diastolic blood pressure of 95 to 109 mm Hg. The primary end point "success" was defined as the patient having achieved a diastolic blood pressure of <90 mm Hg at the end of the drug titration period and having maintained a diastolic blood pressure of <95 mm Hg for 1 year without drug intolerance. The original published success rate data (N Engl J Med 1993; 328: 914-921) were discovered to be in error due to a computer programming code omission (N Engl J Med 1994; 330: 1689). This paper presents corrected graphic figures. The corrected success rates were generally higher than originally published. Overall, diltiazem (72%) was significantly higher than hydrochlorothiazide (55%), prazosin (54%), captopril (50%), and placebo (31%); clonidine (62%) and atenolol (60%) were intermediate. There were some changes in the hierarchy of drug response, but important differences in success rates according to age by race subgroups remained. Whites responded well to all drug classes, except for lower efficacy of hydrochlorothiazide in younger whites. Blacks responded better to diltiazem than other agents. In addition, we have analyzed the data using a definition of success based on <90 mm Hg for 1 year. Use of the <90 mm Hg criterion reduced the rate of success, but had only a minor effect on the drug success rate hierarchy. We conclude that single-drug antihypertensive therapy is effective in a majority of stage 1 to 2 diastolic hypertensive patients, although there are important age-by-race differences in success rates among various drug classes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028930346&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028930346&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0895-7061(94)00196-I

DO - 10.1016/0895-7061(94)00196-I

M3 - Article

C2 - 7755948

AN - SCOPUS:0028930346

VL - 8

SP - 189

EP - 192

JO - American Journal of Hypertension

JF - American Journal of Hypertension

SN - 0895-7061

IS - 2

ER -