Depression, Anxiety, and Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescents and Young Adults With Allergies and Asthma

Elizabeth S. Molzon, Stephanie E. Hullmann, Angelica Eddington, Larry L. Mullins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study sought to compare rates of depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with allergies, asthma, and healthy controls. Participants were undergraduate students aged 18 to 29 years with self-reported allergies (N = 79), asthma (N = 79), and with no history of a chronic illness (N = 79). Participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, and the SF-36 Health Survey Questionnaire as self-report measures of depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, and HRQOL, respectively. A series of ANCOVAs (analysis of covariance; allergies vs asthma vs healthy controls) was conducted to examine differences between the groups. The results of the current examination suggest that AYAs with allergies are indeed at risk for experiencing higher rates of depressive and anxious symptoms and poorer HRQOL than healthy AYAs. Furthermore, they are experiencing psychosocial concerns on par with or worse than those of AYAs with asthma. Allergies, often perceived as a relatively benign illness, have commonly been overlooked in discussions of psychosocial concerns related to chronic illnesses. The results of the current study suggest that young adults with allergies are also an important population to examine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-294
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Asthma and Allergy Educators
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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Young Adult
Hypersensitivity
Asthma
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Depression
Chronic Disease
Health Surveys
Self Report
Epidemiologic Studies
Students
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Depression, Anxiety, and Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescents and Young Adults With Allergies and Asthma. / Molzon, Elizabeth S.; Hullmann, Stephanie E.; Eddington, Angelica; Mullins, Larry L.

In: Journal of Asthma and Allergy Educators, Vol. 2, No. 6, 01.12.2011, p. 288-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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