Design of a randomized, controlled, comparative-effectiveness trial testing a Family Model of Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) vs. Standard DSME for Marshallese in the United States

Karen Hye cheon Kim Yeary, Christopher R. Long, Zoran Bursac, Pearl Anna McElfish

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a significant public health problem, with U.S. Pacific Islander communities—such as the Marshallese—bearing a disproportionate burden. Using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages the strong family-based social infrastructure characteristic of Marshallese communities is a promising way to manage T2D. Objectives Led by a collaborative community-academic partnership, the Family Model of Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) aimed to change diabetes management behaviors to improve glycemic control in Marshallese adults with T2D by engaging the entire family. Design To test the Family Model of DSME, a randomized, controlled, comparative effectiveness trial with 240 primary participants was implemented. Half of the primary participants were randomly assigned to the Standard DSME and half were randomly assigned to the Family Model DSME. Both arms received ten hours of content comprised of 6–8 sessions delivered over a 6–8 week period. Methods The Family Model DSME was a cultural adaptation of DSME, whereby the intervention focused on engaging family support for the primary participant with T2D. The Standard DSME was delivered to the primary participant in a community-based group format. Primary participants and participating family members were assessed at baseline and immediate post-intervention, and will also be assessed at 6 and 12 months. Summary The Family Model of DSME aimed to improve glycemic control in Marshallese with T2D. The utilization of a CBPR approach that involves the local stakeholders and the engagement of the family-based social infrastructure of Marshallese communities increase potential for the intervention's success and sustainability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-104
Number of pages8
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials Communications
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Self Care
Education
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Public Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Design of a randomized, controlled, comparative-effectiveness trial testing a Family Model of Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) vs. Standard DSME for Marshallese in the United States",
abstract = "Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a significant public health problem, with U.S. Pacific Islander communities—such as the Marshallese—bearing a disproportionate burden. Using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages the strong family-based social infrastructure characteristic of Marshallese communities is a promising way to manage T2D. Objectives Led by a collaborative community-academic partnership, the Family Model of Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) aimed to change diabetes management behaviors to improve glycemic control in Marshallese adults with T2D by engaging the entire family. Design To test the Family Model of DSME, a randomized, controlled, comparative effectiveness trial with 240 primary participants was implemented. Half of the primary participants were randomly assigned to the Standard DSME and half were randomly assigned to the Family Model DSME. Both arms received ten hours of content comprised of 6–8 sessions delivered over a 6–8 week period. Methods The Family Model DSME was a cultural adaptation of DSME, whereby the intervention focused on engaging family support for the primary participant with T2D. The Standard DSME was delivered to the primary participant in a community-based group format. Primary participants and participating family members were assessed at baseline and immediate post-intervention, and will also be assessed at 6 and 12 months. Summary The Family Model of DSME aimed to improve glycemic control in Marshallese with T2D. The utilization of a CBPR approach that involves the local stakeholders and the engagement of the family-based social infrastructure of Marshallese communities increase potential for the intervention's success and sustainability.",
author = "{Kim Yeary}, {Karen Hye cheon} and Long, {Christopher R.} and Zoran Bursac and McElfish, {Pearl Anna}",
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AU - McElfish, Pearl Anna

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N2 - Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a significant public health problem, with U.S. Pacific Islander communities—such as the Marshallese—bearing a disproportionate burden. Using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages the strong family-based social infrastructure characteristic of Marshallese communities is a promising way to manage T2D. Objectives Led by a collaborative community-academic partnership, the Family Model of Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) aimed to change diabetes management behaviors to improve glycemic control in Marshallese adults with T2D by engaging the entire family. Design To test the Family Model of DSME, a randomized, controlled, comparative effectiveness trial with 240 primary participants was implemented. Half of the primary participants were randomly assigned to the Standard DSME and half were randomly assigned to the Family Model DSME. Both arms received ten hours of content comprised of 6–8 sessions delivered over a 6–8 week period. Methods The Family Model DSME was a cultural adaptation of DSME, whereby the intervention focused on engaging family support for the primary participant with T2D. The Standard DSME was delivered to the primary participant in a community-based group format. Primary participants and participating family members were assessed at baseline and immediate post-intervention, and will also be assessed at 6 and 12 months. Summary The Family Model of DSME aimed to improve glycemic control in Marshallese with T2D. The utilization of a CBPR approach that involves the local stakeholders and the engagement of the family-based social infrastructure of Marshallese communities increase potential for the intervention's success and sustainability.

AB - Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a significant public health problem, with U.S. Pacific Islander communities—such as the Marshallese—bearing a disproportionate burden. Using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages the strong family-based social infrastructure characteristic of Marshallese communities is a promising way to manage T2D. Objectives Led by a collaborative community-academic partnership, the Family Model of Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) aimed to change diabetes management behaviors to improve glycemic control in Marshallese adults with T2D by engaging the entire family. Design To test the Family Model of DSME, a randomized, controlled, comparative effectiveness trial with 240 primary participants was implemented. Half of the primary participants were randomly assigned to the Standard DSME and half were randomly assigned to the Family Model DSME. Both arms received ten hours of content comprised of 6–8 sessions delivered over a 6–8 week period. Methods The Family Model DSME was a cultural adaptation of DSME, whereby the intervention focused on engaging family support for the primary participant with T2D. The Standard DSME was delivered to the primary participant in a community-based group format. Primary participants and participating family members were assessed at baseline and immediate post-intervention, and will also be assessed at 6 and 12 months. Summary The Family Model of DSME aimed to improve glycemic control in Marshallese with T2D. The utilization of a CBPR approach that involves the local stakeholders and the engagement of the family-based social infrastructure of Marshallese communities increase potential for the intervention's success and sustainability.

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