Detection of sequences in the cerebellar cortex

Numerical estimate of the possible number of tidal-wave inducing sequences represented

Fahad Sultan, Detlef Heck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The two major cortices of the brain - the cerebral and cerebellar cortex - are massively connected through intercalated nuclei (pontine, cerebellar and thalamic nuclei). We suggest that the two cortices co-operate by generating precise temporal patterns in the cerebral cortex that are detected in the cerebellar cortex as temporal patterns assembled spatially in the mossy fibers. We will begin by showing that the tidal-wave mechanism works in the cerebellar cortex as a read-out mechanism for such spatio-temporal patterns due to the synchronous activity they generate in the parallel fiber system which drives the Purkinje cells - the output neurons of the cerebellar cortex - to fire action potentials. We will review the anatomy of the mossy fibers and show that within a "beam", or "row" of cerebellar cortex the mossy fibers in principle could embed a vast number of tidal-wave generating sequences. Based on anatomical data we will argue that the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell-Purkinje cell system can potentially detect and - through learning - select from an enormous number of spatio-temporal patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)591-600
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Physiology Paris
Volume97
Issue number4-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

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Tidal Waves
Cerebellar Cortex
Purkinje Cells
Nerve Fibers
Cerebral Cortex
Cerebellar Nuclei
Thalamic Nuclei
Action Potentials
Anatomy
Learning
Neurons
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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N2 - The two major cortices of the brain - the cerebral and cerebellar cortex - are massively connected through intercalated nuclei (pontine, cerebellar and thalamic nuclei). We suggest that the two cortices co-operate by generating precise temporal patterns in the cerebral cortex that are detected in the cerebellar cortex as temporal patterns assembled spatially in the mossy fibers. We will begin by showing that the tidal-wave mechanism works in the cerebellar cortex as a read-out mechanism for such spatio-temporal patterns due to the synchronous activity they generate in the parallel fiber system which drives the Purkinje cells - the output neurons of the cerebellar cortex - to fire action potentials. We will review the anatomy of the mossy fibers and show that within a "beam", or "row" of cerebellar cortex the mossy fibers in principle could embed a vast number of tidal-wave generating sequences. Based on anatomical data we will argue that the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell-Purkinje cell system can potentially detect and - through learning - select from an enormous number of spatio-temporal patterns.

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