Determinants of peak bone mass in young adult women: A review

J. J.B. Anderson, Frances Tylavsky, L. Halioua, J. A. Metz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In concluding this review on the prevention on bone mass throughout the life, it must be emphasized that we need to learn much more about improving the development, maintenance and efficiency of the musculoskeletal system of women during all stages of the life cycle, but especially during adolescence and early adulthood when the greatest gains can be obtained. Even during the adult and postmenopausal years of life, interventions can be effectively tailored to yield significant, but small, improvements in bone mass and reductions in fracture rates. Both dietary and exercise/strength modalities need to be explored, separately and in combination, to accomplish these potentially achievable goals of improved bone mass and reduced fracture rates. Dietary calcium intakes need to be around 800-1000 mg/day (or possibly more) from early adolescence to late life, and such intake levels greatly exceed the WHO recommendation of 400-500 mg/day. In addition, vitamin D intakes need to be adequate so that calcium absorption can be optimized by postmenopausal women. Finally, excessive intakes of animal protein and phosphorus by adult women may adversely affect calcium retention by the skeleton.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-36
Number of pages5
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume3
Issue number1 Supplement
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Young Adult
Bone and Bones
Calcium
Dietary Calcium
Musculoskeletal System
Fracture Fixation
Life Cycle Stages
Skeleton
Vitamin D
Phosphorus
Maintenance
Exercise
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Determinants of peak bone mass in young adult women : A review. / Anderson, J. J.B.; Tylavsky, Frances; Halioua, L.; Metz, J. A.

In: Osteoporosis International, Vol. 3, No. 1 Supplement, 01.01.1993, p. 32-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Anderson, J. J.B. ; Tylavsky, Frances ; Halioua, L. ; Metz, J. A. / Determinants of peak bone mass in young adult women : A review. In: Osteoporosis International. 1993 ; Vol. 3, No. 1 Supplement. pp. 32-36.
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