Determination of cytokine protein levels in cervical mucus samples from young women by a multiplex immunoassay method and assessment of correlates

Jay Lieberman, Anna Barbara Moscicki, Jan L. Sumerel, Yifei Ma, Mark E. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cytokines in cervical mucus are likely to play important roles in controlling pathogens. The cervical mucosal environment is complex, however, with many endogenous and exogenous factors that may affect cytokine levels. We used a multiplex, suspension-array-based immunoassay method to measure 10 proinflammatory (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and IL-8) and immunoregulatory (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-13) cytokines in cervical mucus specimens collected via ophthalmic sponge from 72 healthy, nonpregnant women and correlate their levels with biologic and behavioral covariates in a cross-sectional design. Proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines were readily detected, although proinflammatory cytokines were present at markedly higher levels than were immunoregulatory cytokines. Among the covariates examined, the most striking finding was the significant (P ≤ 0.05) association between depressed levels of the cytokines IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 and cigarette smoking. Also, nonsignificant trends toward lower cytokine levels were found in the settings of incident and persistent human papillomavirus infection. The ready detection of proinflammatory cytokines may be reflective of the female genital tract as an anatomic site that is constantly exposed to immunogenic stimulation. Cigarette smoking appears to downregulate cytokine responses in the cervical mucosa, which may help explain the implicated role of tobacco use as a cofactor for cervical cancer development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-54
Number of pages6
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Cervix Mucus
Immunoassay
Cytokines
Proteins
Interleukin-1
Tobacco Products
Interleukin-10
Interleukin-6
Smoking
Papillomavirus Infections
Interleukin-13
Tobacco
Interleukin-5
Tobacco Use
Porifera
Pathogens
Interleukin-12
Interleukin-8
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Interleukin-4

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Determination of cytokine protein levels in cervical mucus samples from young women by a multiplex immunoassay method and assessment of correlates. / Lieberman, Jay; Moscicki, Anna Barbara; Sumerel, Jan L.; Ma, Yifei; Scott, Mark E.

In: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 49-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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