Developing an intervention to address physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA)

Dori Pekmezi, Bess Marcus, Karen Meneses, Monica L. Baskin, Jamy D. Ard, Michelle Y. Martin, Natasia Adams, Cody Robinson, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To address high rates of inactivity and related chronic diseases among African-American women. Materials & methods: Eleven focus groups on physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA) were conducted (n = 56). Feedback guided an intervention development process. The resulting Home-Based Individually Tailored Physical Activity Print intervention was vetted with the target population in a 1-month, single arm, pre-post test demonstration trial (n = 10). Results: Retention was high (90%). Intent-to-treat analyses indicated increases in motivational readiness for physical activity (70% of sample) and physical activity (7-day Physical Activity Recall) from baseline (mean: 89.5 min/week, standard deviation: 61.17) to 1 month (mean: 155 min/week, standard deviation: 100.86). Small improvements in fitness (6-Min Walk Test), weight and psychosocial process measures were also found. Conclusion: Preliminary findings show promise and call for future randomized controlled trials with larger samples to determine efficacy. Such low-cost, high-reach approaches to promoting physical activity have great potential for addressing health disparities and benefiting public health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-312
Number of pages12
JournalWomen's Health
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

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Architectural Accessibility
African Americans
Exercise
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Health Services Needs and Demand
Focus Groups
Chronic Disease
Randomized Controlled Trials
Public Health
Weights and Measures
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pekmezi, D., Marcus, B., Meneses, K., Baskin, M. L., Ard, J. D., Martin, M. Y., ... Demark-Wahnefried, W. (2013). Developing an intervention to address physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA). Women's Health, 9(3), 301-312. https://doi.org/10.2217/whe.13.20

Developing an intervention to address physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA). / Pekmezi, Dori; Marcus, Bess; Meneses, Karen; Baskin, Monica L.; Ard, Jamy D.; Martin, Michelle Y.; Adams, Natasia; Robinson, Cody; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy.

In: Women's Health, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.05.2013, p. 301-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pekmezi, D, Marcus, B, Meneses, K, Baskin, ML, Ard, JD, Martin, MY, Adams, N, Robinson, C & Demark-Wahnefried, W 2013, 'Developing an intervention to address physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA)', Women's Health, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 301-312. https://doi.org/10.2217/whe.13.20
Pekmezi, Dori ; Marcus, Bess ; Meneses, Karen ; Baskin, Monica L. ; Ard, Jamy D. ; Martin, Michelle Y. ; Adams, Natasia ; Robinson, Cody ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy. / Developing an intervention to address physical activity barriers for African-American women in the deep south (USA). In: Women's Health. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 301-312.
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