Development and content validation of family practice residency recruitment questionnaires

Lorraine Silver Wallace, Gregory Blake, Jon Parham, Ruth E. Baldridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: The residency recruitment process involves a substantial time andfinancial commitment on the part of medical students and residency programs. This paper describes the development and content validation process of two written questionnaires designed to assess the application and interview process at our family practice residency program. Methods: Two written questionnaires were developed after completion of a literature review and from areas deemed important by our academic faculty. Drafts of each questionnaire were sent to nine jurors to assess content validity. Content reviewers provided both a qualitative and a quantitative assessment of each questionnaire. Results: The inclusion of both open- and closed-ended questions/items was deemed necessary and appropriate by the panel of content jurors. Assessing faculty, residents, curriculum, program's reputation, geographic location, and spouse/family influence were considered the most important factors to include on the questionnaires when assessing a family practice residency program. Conclusions: With increasing pressure to fill positions across many family practice residency programs, it is important for faculty involved in the recruitment process to recognize that both factors within and out of their control contribute to the selection process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-498
Number of pages3
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume35
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

Fingerprint

Family Practice
Internship and Residency
Geographic Locations
Spouses
Medical Students
Curriculum
Surveys and Questionnaires
Interviews
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Development and content validation of family practice residency recruitment questionnaires. / Wallace, Lorraine Silver; Blake, Gregory; Parham, Jon; Baldridge, Ruth E.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 496-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wallace, Lorraine Silver ; Blake, Gregory ; Parham, Jon ; Baldridge, Ruth E. / Development and content validation of family practice residency recruitment questionnaires. In: Family Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 35, No. 7. pp. 496-498.
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