Development of an Instrument to Measure Academic Resilience Among Pharmacy Students

Marie Chisholm-Burns, Christina Spivey, Erin Sherwin, Jennifer Williams, Stephanie Phelps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To develop a valid and reliable academic resilience scale for use in the didactic portion of the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum to identify those pharmacy students who have greater capacity to overcome academic adversity. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among first-year, second-year, and third-year pharmacy students to assess psychometric properties of a 30-item adapted academic resilience scale. Data were also collected using the Short Grit Scale (Grit-S). Demographic characteristics were collected from student records. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to determine the number of underlying factors responsible for data covariation. Principal components analysis was used as the extraction method. Varimax rotation method was used, and the Cronbach alpha was estimated. Validity testing was conducted by calculating Pearson's r correlations between the adapted academic resilience scale and Grit-S. Results. The survey response rate was 84%. The final version of the scale, the Academic Pharmacy Resilience Scale (APRS-16), had four subscales and 16 items (14 items failed to load on any of the factors and were deleted). The Cronbach alpha was .84, indicating strong internal consistency. The APRS-16 and its subscales were significantly correlated to the Grit-S and its subscales, providing evidence of effective convergent validity. Conclusion. Evidence supports the reliability and validity of the APRS-16 as a measure of academic resilience in pharmacy students. Future studies should use the APRS-16 to investigate the relationship between academic resilience and performance outcomes among pharmacy students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume83
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Pharmacy Students
resilience
student
Principal Component Analysis
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Curriculum
Statistical Factor Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Students
didactics
psychometrics
evidence
factor analysis
curriculum
performance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Development of an Instrument to Measure Academic Resilience Among Pharmacy Students. / Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Spivey, Christina; Sherwin, Erin; Williams, Jennifer; Phelps, Stephanie.

In: American journal of pharmaceutical education, Vol. 83, No. 6, 01.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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