Diagnostic imaging for chronic orofacial pain, maxillofacial osseous and soft tissue pathology and temporomandibular disorders.

Werner Shintaku, Reyes Enciso, Jack Broussard, Glenn T. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since dentists can be faced by unusual cases during their professional life, this article reviews the common orofacial disorders that are of concern to a dentist trying to diagnose the source of pain or dysfunction symptoms, providing an overview of the essential knowledge and usage of nowadays available advanced diagnostic imaging modalities. In addition to symptom-driven diagnostic dilemmas, where such imaging is utilized, occasionally there are asymptomatic anomalies discovered by routine clinical care and/or on dental or panoramic images that need more discussion. The correct selection criteria of an image exam should be based on the individual characteristics of the patient, and the type of imaging technique should be selected depending on the specific clinical problem, the kind of tissue to be visualized, the information obtained from the imaging modality, radiation exposure, and the cost of the examination. The usage of more specialized imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, ultrasound, as well as single photon computed tomography, positron electron tomography, and their hybrid machines, SPECT/ CT and PET/CT, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-644
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the California Dental Association
Volume34
Issue number8
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Facial Pain
Diagnostic Imaging
Dentists
Chronic Pain
Tomography
Electron Microscope Tomography
Pathology
Photons
Patient Selection
Tooth
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Electrons
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pain
Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography Computed Tomography
Radiation Exposure
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Diagnostic imaging for chronic orofacial pain, maxillofacial osseous and soft tissue pathology and temporomandibular disorders. / Shintaku, Werner; Enciso, Reyes; Broussard, Jack; Clark, Glenn T.

In: Journal of the California Dental Association, Vol. 34, No. 8, 01.01.2006, p. 633-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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