Dietary and Physical Activity Counseling Trends in U.S. Children, 2002–2011

Adebowale Odulana, William T. Basco, Kinfe G. Bishu, Leonard E. Egede

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction In 2007 and 2010, Expert Committee and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines were released, respectively, urging U.S. practitioners to deliver preventive obesity counseling for children. This study determined the frequency and evaluated predictors of receiving counseling for diet and physical activity among a national sample of children from 2002 to 2011. Methods Children aged 6–17 years were used from the 2002–2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys and analyzed in 2016. Parental report of two questions assessed whether children received both dietary and exercise counseling from the provider. Children were grouped by weight category. Bivariate analyses compared the frequency of receiving counseling; logistic regression evaluated predictors of receiving counseling. Results The sample included 36,114 children; <50% of children received counseling. Across all time periods, children were more likely to receive counseling with increasing weight. Logistic regression models showed that obese children had greater odds of receiving counseling versus normal-weight children, even after adjusting for covariates. Additional significant positive correlates of receiving counseling were Hispanic ethnicity, living in an urban setting, and being in the highest income stratum. Being uninsured was associated with lower odds of counseling. Years 2007–2009 and 2010–2011 were associated with increased counseling versus the benchmark year category in the multivariable model. Conclusions Counseling appears more likely with greater weight and increased after both guidelines in 2007 and 2010. Overall counseling rates for children remain low. Future work should focus on marginalized groups, such as racial and ethnic minorities and rural populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-16
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Counseling
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Logistic Models
Guidelines
Benchmarking
Pediatric Obesity
Rural Population
Advisory Committees
Health Expenditures
Hispanic Americans
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Dietary and Physical Activity Counseling Trends in U.S. Children, 2002–2011. / Odulana, Adebowale; Basco, William T.; Bishu, Kinfe G.; Egede, Leonard E.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.07.2017, p. 9-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Odulana, Adebowale ; Basco, William T. ; Bishu, Kinfe G. ; Egede, Leonard E. / Dietary and Physical Activity Counseling Trends in U.S. Children, 2002–2011. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 9-16.
@article{b69e543e92a84577b5792617ec43294e,
title = "Dietary and Physical Activity Counseling Trends in U.S. Children, 2002–2011",
abstract = "Introduction In 2007 and 2010, Expert Committee and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines were released, respectively, urging U.S. practitioners to deliver preventive obesity counseling for children. This study determined the frequency and evaluated predictors of receiving counseling for diet and physical activity among a national sample of children from 2002 to 2011. Methods Children aged 6–17 years were used from the 2002–2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys and analyzed in 2016. Parental report of two questions assessed whether children received both dietary and exercise counseling from the provider. Children were grouped by weight category. Bivariate analyses compared the frequency of receiving counseling; logistic regression evaluated predictors of receiving counseling. Results The sample included 36,114 children; <50{\%} of children received counseling. Across all time periods, children were more likely to receive counseling with increasing weight. Logistic regression models showed that obese children had greater odds of receiving counseling versus normal-weight children, even after adjusting for covariates. Additional significant positive correlates of receiving counseling were Hispanic ethnicity, living in an urban setting, and being in the highest income stratum. Being uninsured was associated with lower odds of counseling. Years 2007–2009 and 2010–2011 were associated with increased counseling versus the benchmark year category in the multivariable model. Conclusions Counseling appears more likely with greater weight and increased after both guidelines in 2007 and 2010. Overall counseling rates for children remain low. Future work should focus on marginalized groups, such as racial and ethnic minorities and rural populations.",
author = "Adebowale Odulana and Basco, {William T.} and Bishu, {Kinfe G.} and Egede, {Leonard E.}",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.039",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
pages = "9--16",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary and Physical Activity Counseling Trends in U.S. Children, 2002–2011

AU - Odulana, Adebowale

AU - Basco, William T.

AU - Bishu, Kinfe G.

AU - Egede, Leonard E.

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Introduction In 2007 and 2010, Expert Committee and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines were released, respectively, urging U.S. practitioners to deliver preventive obesity counseling for children. This study determined the frequency and evaluated predictors of receiving counseling for diet and physical activity among a national sample of children from 2002 to 2011. Methods Children aged 6–17 years were used from the 2002–2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys and analyzed in 2016. Parental report of two questions assessed whether children received both dietary and exercise counseling from the provider. Children were grouped by weight category. Bivariate analyses compared the frequency of receiving counseling; logistic regression evaluated predictors of receiving counseling. Results The sample included 36,114 children; <50% of children received counseling. Across all time periods, children were more likely to receive counseling with increasing weight. Logistic regression models showed that obese children had greater odds of receiving counseling versus normal-weight children, even after adjusting for covariates. Additional significant positive correlates of receiving counseling were Hispanic ethnicity, living in an urban setting, and being in the highest income stratum. Being uninsured was associated with lower odds of counseling. Years 2007–2009 and 2010–2011 were associated with increased counseling versus the benchmark year category in the multivariable model. Conclusions Counseling appears more likely with greater weight and increased after both guidelines in 2007 and 2010. Overall counseling rates for children remain low. Future work should focus on marginalized groups, such as racial and ethnic minorities and rural populations.

AB - Introduction In 2007 and 2010, Expert Committee and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines were released, respectively, urging U.S. practitioners to deliver preventive obesity counseling for children. This study determined the frequency and evaluated predictors of receiving counseling for diet and physical activity among a national sample of children from 2002 to 2011. Methods Children aged 6–17 years were used from the 2002–2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys and analyzed in 2016. Parental report of two questions assessed whether children received both dietary and exercise counseling from the provider. Children were grouped by weight category. Bivariate analyses compared the frequency of receiving counseling; logistic regression evaluated predictors of receiving counseling. Results The sample included 36,114 children; <50% of children received counseling. Across all time periods, children were more likely to receive counseling with increasing weight. Logistic regression models showed that obese children had greater odds of receiving counseling versus normal-weight children, even after adjusting for covariates. Additional significant positive correlates of receiving counseling were Hispanic ethnicity, living in an urban setting, and being in the highest income stratum. Being uninsured was associated with lower odds of counseling. Years 2007–2009 and 2010–2011 were associated with increased counseling versus the benchmark year category in the multivariable model. Conclusions Counseling appears more likely with greater weight and increased after both guidelines in 2007 and 2010. Overall counseling rates for children remain low. Future work should focus on marginalized groups, such as racial and ethnic minorities and rural populations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85016548521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85016548521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.039

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.01.039

M3 - Article

VL - 53

SP - 9

EP - 16

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 1

ER -