Dietary factors in relation to endometrial cancer

A nationwide case-control study in Sweden

Paul Terry, Harri Vainio, Alicja Wolk, Elisabete Weiderpass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of endometrial cancer varies up to 10-fold between high- and low-incidence regions, suggesting the importance of environmental factors, including diet, in the etiology of this disease. However, few studies have examined the role of diet in the etiology of endometrial cancer. Using unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), we analyzed data from a large, case-control study of Swedish-born postmenopausal women aged 50-74 yr (709 cases and 2,887 controls) residing in Sweden between 1994 and 1995. We found no clear association between foods or food groups and endometrial cancer risk, although high consumption of certain foods, such as Brassica vegetables, coffee, and legumes, might be associated with small-to-moderate reduced risks of endometrial cancer, while red meat consumption might be associated with a small-to-moderate increased risk. Daily use of calcium supplements appeared to lower endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9, P for trend = 0.04), especially among women with low calcium intake from dairy products. On the other hand, the use of iron supplements appeared to increase the risk (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.9-3.3, P for trend = 0.03). The findings are discussed with respect to previous studies and the possible underlying mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Endometrial Neoplasms
Sweden
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Food
Incidence
Diet
Calcium
Dairy Products
Brassica
Coffee
Fabaceae
Vegetables
Iron
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Dietary factors in relation to endometrial cancer : A nationwide case-control study in Sweden. / Terry, Paul; Vainio, Harri; Wolk, Alicja; Weiderpass, Elisabete.

In: Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 25-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terry, Paul ; Vainio, Harri ; Wolk, Alicja ; Weiderpass, Elisabete. / Dietary factors in relation to endometrial cancer : A nationwide case-control study in Sweden. In: Nutrition and Cancer. 2002 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 25-32.
@article{9602cea7f4b242b192153717741c6f0e,
title = "Dietary factors in relation to endometrial cancer: A nationwide case-control study in Sweden",
abstract = "The incidence of endometrial cancer varies up to 10-fold between high- and low-incidence regions, suggesting the importance of environmental factors, including diet, in the etiology of this disease. However, few studies have examined the role of diet in the etiology of endometrial cancer. Using unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI), we analyzed data from a large, case-control study of Swedish-born postmenopausal women aged 50-74 yr (709 cases and 2,887 controls) residing in Sweden between 1994 and 1995. We found no clear association between foods or food groups and endometrial cancer risk, although high consumption of certain foods, such as Brassica vegetables, coffee, and legumes, might be associated with small-to-moderate reduced risks of endometrial cancer, while red meat consumption might be associated with a small-to-moderate increased risk. Daily use of calcium supplements appeared to lower endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.5, 95{\%} CI = 0.3-0.9, P for trend = 0.04), especially among women with low calcium intake from dairy products. On the other hand, the use of iron supplements appeared to increase the risk (OR = 1.7, 95{\%} CI = 0.9-3.3, P for trend = 0.03). The findings are discussed with respect to previous studies and the possible underlying mechanisms.",
author = "Paul Terry and Harri Vainio and Alicja Wolk and Elisabete Weiderpass",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1207/S15327914NC421_4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "25--32",
journal = "Nutrition and Cancer",
issn = "0163-5581",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary factors in relation to endometrial cancer

T2 - A nationwide case-control study in Sweden

AU - Terry, Paul

AU - Vainio, Harri

AU - Wolk, Alicja

AU - Weiderpass, Elisabete

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - The incidence of endometrial cancer varies up to 10-fold between high- and low-incidence regions, suggesting the importance of environmental factors, including diet, in the etiology of this disease. However, few studies have examined the role of diet in the etiology of endometrial cancer. Using unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), we analyzed data from a large, case-control study of Swedish-born postmenopausal women aged 50-74 yr (709 cases and 2,887 controls) residing in Sweden between 1994 and 1995. We found no clear association between foods or food groups and endometrial cancer risk, although high consumption of certain foods, such as Brassica vegetables, coffee, and legumes, might be associated with small-to-moderate reduced risks of endometrial cancer, while red meat consumption might be associated with a small-to-moderate increased risk. Daily use of calcium supplements appeared to lower endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9, P for trend = 0.04), especially among women with low calcium intake from dairy products. On the other hand, the use of iron supplements appeared to increase the risk (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.9-3.3, P for trend = 0.03). The findings are discussed with respect to previous studies and the possible underlying mechanisms.

AB - The incidence of endometrial cancer varies up to 10-fold between high- and low-incidence regions, suggesting the importance of environmental factors, including diet, in the etiology of this disease. However, few studies have examined the role of diet in the etiology of endometrial cancer. Using unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), we analyzed data from a large, case-control study of Swedish-born postmenopausal women aged 50-74 yr (709 cases and 2,887 controls) residing in Sweden between 1994 and 1995. We found no clear association between foods or food groups and endometrial cancer risk, although high consumption of certain foods, such as Brassica vegetables, coffee, and legumes, might be associated with small-to-moderate reduced risks of endometrial cancer, while red meat consumption might be associated with a small-to-moderate increased risk. Daily use of calcium supplements appeared to lower endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9, P for trend = 0.04), especially among women with low calcium intake from dairy products. On the other hand, the use of iron supplements appeared to increase the risk (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.9-3.3, P for trend = 0.03). The findings are discussed with respect to previous studies and the possible underlying mechanisms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036038409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036038409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1207/S15327914NC421_4

DO - 10.1207/S15327914NC421_4

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 25

EP - 32

JO - Nutrition and Cancer

JF - Nutrition and Cancer

SN - 0163-5581

IS - 1

ER -