Dietary inflammatory index and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women

Lauren C. Peres, Elisa V. Bandera, Bo Qin, Kristin A. Guertin, Nitin Shivappa, James R. Hebert, Sarah E. Abbott, Anthony J. Alberg, Jill Barnholtz-Sloan, Melissa Bondy, Michele L. Cote, Ellen Funkhouser, Patricia G. Moorman, Edward S. Peters, Ann G. Schwartz, Paul Terry, Fabian Camacho, Frances Wang, Joellen M. Schildkraut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC); yet the contribution of inflammatory foods and nutrients to EOC risk has been understudied. We investigated the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII), a novel literature-derived tool to assess the inflammatory potential of one's diet, and EOC risk in African American (AA) women in the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study, the largest population-based case–control study of EOC in AA women to date. The energy-adjusted DII (E-DII) was computed per 1,000 kilocalories from dietary intake data collected through a food frequency questionnaire, which measured usual dietary intake in the year prior to diagnosis for cases or interview for controls. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression for the association between the E-DII and EOC risk. 493 cases and 662 controls were included in the analyses. We observed a 10% increase in EOC risk per a one-unit change in the E-DII (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03–1.17). Similarly, women consuming the most pro-inflammatory diet had a statistically significant increased EOC risk in comparison to the most anti-inflammatory diet (ORQuartile4/Quartile1 = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.18–2.51). We also observed effect modification by age (p < 0.05), where a strong, significant association between the E-DII and EOC risk was observed among women older than 60 years, but no association was observed in women aged 60 years or younger. Our findings suggest that a more pro-inflammatory diet was associated with an increased EOC risk, especially among women older than 60 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)535-543
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume140
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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African Americans
Diet
Confidence Intervals
Food
Odds Ratio
Ovarian epithelial cancer
Epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Logistic Models
Interviews
Inflammation
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Peres, L. C., Bandera, E. V., Qin, B., Guertin, K. A., Shivappa, N., Hebert, J. R., ... Schildkraut, J. M. (2017). Dietary inflammatory index and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women. International Journal of Cancer, 140(3), 535-543. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.30467

Dietary inflammatory index and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women. / Peres, Lauren C.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Qin, Bo; Guertin, Kristin A.; Shivappa, Nitin; Hebert, James R.; Abbott, Sarah E.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michele L.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Moorman, Patricia G.; Peters, Edward S.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Terry, Paul; Camacho, Fabian; Wang, Frances; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 140, No. 3, 01.02.2017, p. 535-543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peres, LC, Bandera, EV, Qin, B, Guertin, KA, Shivappa, N, Hebert, JR, Abbott, SE, Alberg, AJ, Barnholtz-Sloan, J, Bondy, M, Cote, ML, Funkhouser, E, Moorman, PG, Peters, ES, Schwartz, AG, Terry, P, Camacho, F, Wang, F & Schildkraut, JM 2017, 'Dietary inflammatory index and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women', International Journal of Cancer, vol. 140, no. 3, pp. 535-543. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.30467
Peres, Lauren C. ; Bandera, Elisa V. ; Qin, Bo ; Guertin, Kristin A. ; Shivappa, Nitin ; Hebert, James R. ; Abbott, Sarah E. ; Alberg, Anthony J. ; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill ; Bondy, Melissa ; Cote, Michele L. ; Funkhouser, Ellen ; Moorman, Patricia G. ; Peters, Edward S. ; Schwartz, Ann G. ; Terry, Paul ; Camacho, Fabian ; Wang, Frances ; Schildkraut, Joellen M. / Dietary inflammatory index and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 140, No. 3. pp. 535-543.
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