Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and risk of prostate cancer in a case–control study among Black and White US Veteran men

Adriana C. Vidal, Taofik Oyekunle, Lauren E. Howard, Nitin Shivappa, Amanda De Hoedt, Jane C. Figueiredo, Emanuela Taioli, Jay Fowke, Pao Hwa Lin, James R. Hebert, Stephen J. Freedland

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Abstract

Background: We hypothesized a pro-inflammatory diet would be associated with higher prostate cancer (PC) risk. Methods: We prospectively recruited incident PC cases (n = 254) and controls (n = 328) at the Durham Veteran Affairs, from 2007 to 2018. From a self-completed 61-item Food Frequency Questionnaire, we calculated dietary inflammatory index (DII ® ) scores with and without supplements. We examined the association between DII scores with and without supplements and overall PC risk using logistic regression and risk of low-grade PC (grade group 1) and high-grade PC (grade group 2–5) with multinomial logistic regression. Results: Cases were more likely to be Black (58 vs. 42%), had higher PSA (6.4 vs. 0.8 ng/ml), lower BMI (29.1 vs. 30.6 kg/m 2 ) and were older (64 vs. 62 years) versus controls (all p < 0.01). Both black controls and cases had higher DII scores with and without supplements, though the DII scores with supplements in controls was not significant. On multivariable analysis, there were no associations between DII with or without supplements and overall PC risk (p-trend = 0.14, p-trend = 0.09, respectively) or low-grade PC (p-trend = 0.72, p-trend = 0.47, respectively). Higher DII scores with (p-trend = 0.04) and without supplements (p = 0.08) were associated with high-grade PC, though the association for DII without supplements was not significant. Conclusions: A pro-inflammatory diet was more common among Black men and associated with high-grade PC in our case–control study. The degree to which a pro-inflammatory diet contributes to PC race disparities warrants further study. If confirmed, studies should test whether a low-inflammatory diet can prevent high-grade PC, particularly among Black men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalProstate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Veterans
Prostatic Neoplasms
Diet
hydroquinone
Logistic Models
Dietary Supplements
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Urology
  • Cancer Research

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Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and risk of prostate cancer in a case–control study among Black and White US Veteran men. / Vidal, Adriana C.; Oyekunle, Taofik; Howard, Lauren E.; Shivappa, Nitin; De Hoedt, Amanda; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Taioli, Emanuela; Fowke, Jay; Lin, Pao Hwa; Hebert, James R.; Freedland, Stephen J.

In: Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vidal, Adriana C. ; Oyekunle, Taofik ; Howard, Lauren E. ; Shivappa, Nitin ; De Hoedt, Amanda ; Figueiredo, Jane C. ; Taioli, Emanuela ; Fowke, Jay ; Lin, Pao Hwa ; Hebert, James R. ; Freedland, Stephen J. / Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and risk of prostate cancer in a case–control study among Black and White US Veteran men. In: Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. 2019.
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abstract = "Background: We hypothesized a pro-inflammatory diet would be associated with higher prostate cancer (PC) risk. Methods: We prospectively recruited incident PC cases (n = 254) and controls (n = 328) at the Durham Veteran Affairs, from 2007 to 2018. From a self-completed 61-item Food Frequency Questionnaire, we calculated dietary inflammatory index (DII {\circledR} ) scores with and without supplements. We examined the association between DII scores with and without supplements and overall PC risk using logistic regression and risk of low-grade PC (grade group 1) and high-grade PC (grade group 2–5) with multinomial logistic regression. Results: Cases were more likely to be Black (58 vs. 42{\%}), had higher PSA (6.4 vs. 0.8 ng/ml), lower BMI (29.1 vs. 30.6 kg/m 2 ) and were older (64 vs. 62 years) versus controls (all p < 0.01). Both black controls and cases had higher DII scores with and without supplements, though the DII scores with supplements in controls was not significant. On multivariable analysis, there were no associations between DII with or without supplements and overall PC risk (p-trend = 0.14, p-trend = 0.09, respectively) or low-grade PC (p-trend = 0.72, p-trend = 0.47, respectively). Higher DII scores with (p-trend = 0.04) and without supplements (p = 0.08) were associated with high-grade PC, though the association for DII without supplements was not significant. Conclusions: A pro-inflammatory diet was more common among Black men and associated with high-grade PC in our case–control study. The degree to which a pro-inflammatory diet contributes to PC race disparities warrants further study. If confirmed, studies should test whether a low-inflammatory diet can prevent high-grade PC, particularly among Black men.",
author = "Vidal, {Adriana C.} and Taofik Oyekunle and Howard, {Lauren E.} and Nitin Shivappa and {De Hoedt}, Amanda and Figueiredo, {Jane C.} and Emanuela Taioli and Jay Fowke and Lin, {Pao Hwa} and Hebert, {James R.} and Freedland, {Stephen J.}",
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T1 - Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and risk of prostate cancer in a case–control study among Black and White US Veteran men

AU - Vidal, Adriana C.

AU - Oyekunle, Taofik

AU - Howard, Lauren E.

AU - Shivappa, Nitin

AU - De Hoedt, Amanda

AU - Figueiredo, Jane C.

AU - Taioli, Emanuela

AU - Fowke, Jay

AU - Lin, Pao Hwa

AU - Hebert, James R.

AU - Freedland, Stephen J.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: We hypothesized a pro-inflammatory diet would be associated with higher prostate cancer (PC) risk. Methods: We prospectively recruited incident PC cases (n = 254) and controls (n = 328) at the Durham Veteran Affairs, from 2007 to 2018. From a self-completed 61-item Food Frequency Questionnaire, we calculated dietary inflammatory index (DII ® ) scores with and without supplements. We examined the association between DII scores with and without supplements and overall PC risk using logistic regression and risk of low-grade PC (grade group 1) and high-grade PC (grade group 2–5) with multinomial logistic regression. Results: Cases were more likely to be Black (58 vs. 42%), had higher PSA (6.4 vs. 0.8 ng/ml), lower BMI (29.1 vs. 30.6 kg/m 2 ) and were older (64 vs. 62 years) versus controls (all p < 0.01). Both black controls and cases had higher DII scores with and without supplements, though the DII scores with supplements in controls was not significant. On multivariable analysis, there were no associations between DII with or without supplements and overall PC risk (p-trend = 0.14, p-trend = 0.09, respectively) or low-grade PC (p-trend = 0.72, p-trend = 0.47, respectively). Higher DII scores with (p-trend = 0.04) and without supplements (p = 0.08) were associated with high-grade PC, though the association for DII without supplements was not significant. Conclusions: A pro-inflammatory diet was more common among Black men and associated with high-grade PC in our case–control study. The degree to which a pro-inflammatory diet contributes to PC race disparities warrants further study. If confirmed, studies should test whether a low-inflammatory diet can prevent high-grade PC, particularly among Black men.

AB - Background: We hypothesized a pro-inflammatory diet would be associated with higher prostate cancer (PC) risk. Methods: We prospectively recruited incident PC cases (n = 254) and controls (n = 328) at the Durham Veteran Affairs, from 2007 to 2018. From a self-completed 61-item Food Frequency Questionnaire, we calculated dietary inflammatory index (DII ® ) scores with and without supplements. We examined the association between DII scores with and without supplements and overall PC risk using logistic regression and risk of low-grade PC (grade group 1) and high-grade PC (grade group 2–5) with multinomial logistic regression. Results: Cases were more likely to be Black (58 vs. 42%), had higher PSA (6.4 vs. 0.8 ng/ml), lower BMI (29.1 vs. 30.6 kg/m 2 ) and were older (64 vs. 62 years) versus controls (all p < 0.01). Both black controls and cases had higher DII scores with and without supplements, though the DII scores with supplements in controls was not significant. On multivariable analysis, there were no associations between DII with or without supplements and overall PC risk (p-trend = 0.14, p-trend = 0.09, respectively) or low-grade PC (p-trend = 0.72, p-trend = 0.47, respectively). Higher DII scores with (p-trend = 0.04) and without supplements (p = 0.08) were associated with high-grade PC, though the association for DII without supplements was not significant. Conclusions: A pro-inflammatory diet was more common among Black men and associated with high-grade PC in our case–control study. The degree to which a pro-inflammatory diet contributes to PC race disparities warrants further study. If confirmed, studies should test whether a low-inflammatory diet can prevent high-grade PC, particularly among Black men.

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