Dietary regulation of intestinal brush-border sugar and amino acid transport in carnivores

Randal Buddington, J. W. Chen, J. M. Diamond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of omnivores and herbivores to regulate reversibly their intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters is functionally related to the unpredictably variable composition of their natural diets. To determine whether carnivores are able similarly to regulate the activities of their intestinal nutrient transporters, we fed to three species of vertebrates that are carnivorous as adults (cats, mink, and leopard frogs) diets with either at least 50% digestible carbohydrate or with negligible carbohydrate levels. Rates of transport for the sugars glucose and fructose and the amino acids (AAs) aspartate, leucine, lysine, and proline were measured throughout the intestine (only proline and glucose in the frogs) by an in vitro everted-sleeve method. Although all three species consume much carbohydrate during early development, only the mink was able to regulate sugar transporter activity in response to changes in levels of dietary carbohydrate. In contrast, the sugar transporters of the cat were unresponsive to varying carbohydrate levels, and long-term feeding of a high-carbohydrate diet caused down-regulation of sugar transport in frogs. Of the three species, only the mink is a member of a family that includes omnivorous species, whereas all members of the families to which the cat and frog belong are carnivorous as adults. All three species were able to regulate rates of AA transport,though the patterns and magnitude of the responses differed between species as well as between AAs, suggesting independent regulation of some AA transporters. Combining these results with published studies of five other species, we conclude that the ability of a species to regulate its intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters in response to changes in dietary composition has been programmed during evolution by the natural diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume261
Issue number4 30-4
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sugar Acids
Microvilli
Mink
Carbohydrates
Amino Acids
Anura
Diet
Cats
Aptitude
Proline
Food
Dietary Carbohydrates
Rana pipiens
Amino Acid Transport Systems
Glucose
Herbivory
Fructose
Aspartic Acid
Leucine
Lysine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology

Cite this

@article{1fd7904c087d44ddbecd9619d44e1ad6,
title = "Dietary regulation of intestinal brush-border sugar and amino acid transport in carnivores",
abstract = "The ability of omnivores and herbivores to regulate reversibly their intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters is functionally related to the unpredictably variable composition of their natural diets. To determine whether carnivores are able similarly to regulate the activities of their intestinal nutrient transporters, we fed to three species of vertebrates that are carnivorous as adults (cats, mink, and leopard frogs) diets with either at least 50{\%} digestible carbohydrate or with negligible carbohydrate levels. Rates of transport for the sugars glucose and fructose and the amino acids (AAs) aspartate, leucine, lysine, and proline were measured throughout the intestine (only proline and glucose in the frogs) by an in vitro everted-sleeve method. Although all three species consume much carbohydrate during early development, only the mink was able to regulate sugar transporter activity in response to changes in levels of dietary carbohydrate. In contrast, the sugar transporters of the cat were unresponsive to varying carbohydrate levels, and long-term feeding of a high-carbohydrate diet caused down-regulation of sugar transport in frogs. Of the three species, only the mink is a member of a family that includes omnivorous species, whereas all members of the families to which the cat and frog belong are carnivorous as adults. All three species were able to regulate rates of AA transport,though the patterns and magnitude of the responses differed between species as well as between AAs, suggesting independent regulation of some AA transporters. Combining these results with published studies of five other species, we conclude that the ability of a species to regulate its intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters in response to changes in dietary composition has been programmed during evolution by the natural diet.",
author = "Randal Buddington and Chen, {J. W.} and Diamond, {J. M.}",
year = "1991",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "261",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0363-6119",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "4 30-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary regulation of intestinal brush-border sugar and amino acid transport in carnivores

AU - Buddington, Randal

AU - Chen, J. W.

AU - Diamond, J. M.

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - The ability of omnivores and herbivores to regulate reversibly their intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters is functionally related to the unpredictably variable composition of their natural diets. To determine whether carnivores are able similarly to regulate the activities of their intestinal nutrient transporters, we fed to three species of vertebrates that are carnivorous as adults (cats, mink, and leopard frogs) diets with either at least 50% digestible carbohydrate or with negligible carbohydrate levels. Rates of transport for the sugars glucose and fructose and the amino acids (AAs) aspartate, leucine, lysine, and proline were measured throughout the intestine (only proline and glucose in the frogs) by an in vitro everted-sleeve method. Although all three species consume much carbohydrate during early development, only the mink was able to regulate sugar transporter activity in response to changes in levels of dietary carbohydrate. In contrast, the sugar transporters of the cat were unresponsive to varying carbohydrate levels, and long-term feeding of a high-carbohydrate diet caused down-regulation of sugar transport in frogs. Of the three species, only the mink is a member of a family that includes omnivorous species, whereas all members of the families to which the cat and frog belong are carnivorous as adults. All three species were able to regulate rates of AA transport,though the patterns and magnitude of the responses differed between species as well as between AAs, suggesting independent regulation of some AA transporters. Combining these results with published studies of five other species, we conclude that the ability of a species to regulate its intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters in response to changes in dietary composition has been programmed during evolution by the natural diet.

AB - The ability of omnivores and herbivores to regulate reversibly their intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters is functionally related to the unpredictably variable composition of their natural diets. To determine whether carnivores are able similarly to regulate the activities of their intestinal nutrient transporters, we fed to three species of vertebrates that are carnivorous as adults (cats, mink, and leopard frogs) diets with either at least 50% digestible carbohydrate or with negligible carbohydrate levels. Rates of transport for the sugars glucose and fructose and the amino acids (AAs) aspartate, leucine, lysine, and proline were measured throughout the intestine (only proline and glucose in the frogs) by an in vitro everted-sleeve method. Although all three species consume much carbohydrate during early development, only the mink was able to regulate sugar transporter activity in response to changes in levels of dietary carbohydrate. In contrast, the sugar transporters of the cat were unresponsive to varying carbohydrate levels, and long-term feeding of a high-carbohydrate diet caused down-regulation of sugar transport in frogs. Of the three species, only the mink is a member of a family that includes omnivorous species, whereas all members of the families to which the cat and frog belong are carnivorous as adults. All three species were able to regulate rates of AA transport,though the patterns and magnitude of the responses differed between species as well as between AAs, suggesting independent regulation of some AA transporters. Combining these results with published studies of five other species, we conclude that the ability of a species to regulate its intestinal brush-border nutrient transporters in response to changes in dietary composition has been programmed during evolution by the natural diet.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025936491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025936491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 261

JO - American Journal of Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology

SN - 0363-6119

IS - 4 30-4

ER -