Differential associations between sensory response patterns and language, social, and communication measures in children with autism or other developmental disabilities

Linda R. Watson, Elena Patten, Grace T. Baranek, Michele Poe, Brian A. Boyd, Ashley Freuler, Jill Lorenzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To examine patterns of sensory responsiveness (i.e., hyperresponsiveness, hyporesponsiveness, and sensory seeking) as factors that may account for variability in social-communicative symptoms of autism and variability in language, social, and communication skill development in children with autism or other developmental disabilities (DDs). Method: Children with autistic disorder (AD; n = 72, mean age = 52.3 months) and other DDs (n = 44, mean age = 48.1 months) participated in a protocol measuring sensory response patterns; social-communicative symptoms of autism; and language, social, and communication skills. Results: Hyporesponsiveness was positively associated with social-communicative symptom severity, with no significant group difference in the association. Hyperresponsiveness was not significantly associated with social-communicative symptom severity. A group difference emerged for sensory seeking and social-communicative symptom severity, with a positive association for the AD group only. For the 2 groups of children combined, hyporesponsiveness was negatively associated with language skills and social adaptive skills. Sensory seeking also was negatively associated with language skills. These associations did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Aberrant sensory processing may play an important role in the pathogenesis of autism and other DDs as well as in the rate of acquisition of language, social, and communication skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1562-1576
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Developmental Disabilities
Autistic Disorder
autism
Language
disability
Communication
communication skills
communication
language
Group
Child Development
Autism
Language Skills
Social Skills
Communication Skills

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Differential associations between sensory response patterns and language, social, and communication measures in children with autism or other developmental disabilities. / Watson, Linda R.; Patten, Elena; Baranek, Grace T.; Poe, Michele; Boyd, Brian A.; Freuler, Ashley; Lorenzi, Jill.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 54, No. 6, 01.01.2011, p. 1562-1576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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