Differential localization of the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor among striatal neuron types in rats

Yunping Deng, J. P. Xie, H. B. Wang, W. L. Lei, Q. Chen, Anton Reiner

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Abstract

Differences among the various striatal projection neuron and interneuron types in cortical input, function, and vulnerability to degenerative insults may be related to differences among them in AMPA-type glutamate receptor abundance and subunit configuration. We therefore used immunolabeling to assess the frequency and abundance of GluR1 and GluR2, the most common AMPA subunits in striatum, in the main striatal neuron types. All neurons projecting to the external pallidum (GPe), internal pallidum (GPi) or substantia nigra, as identified by retrograde labeling, possessed perikaryal GluR2, while GluR1 was more common in striato-GPe than striato-GPi perikarya. The frequency and intensity of immunostaining indicated the rank order of their perikaryal GluR1:GluR2 ratio to be striato-GPe > striatonigral > striato-GPi. Ultrastructural studies suggested a differential localization of GluR1 and GluR2 to striatal projection neuron dendritic spines as well, with GluR1 seemingly more common in striato-GPe spines and GluR2 more common in striato-GPi and/or striatonigral spines. Comparisons among projection neurons and interneurons revealed GluR1 to be most common and abundant in parvalbuminergic interneurons, and GluR2 most common and abundant in projection neurons, with the rank order for the GluR1:GluR2 ratio being parvalbuminergic interneurons > calretinergic interneurons > cholinergic interneurons > projection neurons > somatostatinergic interneurons. Striosomal projection neurons had a higher GluR1:GluR2 ratio than did matrix projection neurons. The abundance of both GluR1 and GluR2 in striatal parvalbuminergic interneurons and projection neurons is consistent with their prominent cortical input and susceptibility to excitotoxic insult, while differences in GluR1:GluR2 ratio among projection neurons are likely to yield differences in Ca2+ permeability, desensitization, and single channel current, which may contribute to differences among them in plasticity, synaptic integration, and excitotoxic vulnerability. The apparent association of the GluR1 subunit with synaptic plasticity, in particular, suggests striato-GPe neuron spines as a particular site of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity, presumably associated with motor learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-192
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Chemical Neuroanatomy
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Fingerprint

Corpus Striatum
Glutamate Receptors
Interneurons
Neurons
Globus Pallidus
Neuronal Plasticity
Spine
AMPA 2 glutamate receptor ionotropic
Dendritic Spines
alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid
AMPA Receptors
Substantia Nigra
Cholinergic Agents
Permeability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Differential localization of the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor among striatal neuron types in rats. / Deng, Yunping; Xie, J. P.; Wang, H. B.; Lei, W. L.; Chen, Q.; Reiner, Anton.

In: Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.07.2007, p. 167-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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