Differentiating benign from malignant lung lesions using 'quantitative' parameters of FDG PET images

Karl Hubner, Edward Buonocore, Howard R. Gould, Joe Thie, Gary T. Smith, Shawn Stephens, Jennifer Dickey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fluorine-18 labeled deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) applications in oncology include the differential diagnosis of chest masses and single pulmonary nodules. However, FOG is not tumor-specific; rather, it also accumulates in inflammatory processes. This study was performed to identify image parameters that would improve the specificity of PET. Methods: Twenty-six patients who had benign and malignant lung lesions were examined retrospectively. Positron-emission tomography data were acquired in dynamic scanning mode after intravenous bolus of 250-402 MBq of FOG. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated and Patlak analyses were performed in selected regions of interest in the PET images. Positron-emission tomography results were related to histological diagnosis (N = 49) or clinical follow- up (N = 3). Results: The specificity and sensitivity of the original PET scan reports, which was based on visual image interpretation and loosely applied SUVs, was 100% and 73%, respectively. Using the SUVs with a cut-off value of 3.8 and Kpat value with a cut-off at 0.025 min-1 improved the specificity to 81% and 85%. Conclusion: FOG-PET image interpretation can be facilitated by using SUV information or the accumulation rate of the radiotracer (Patlak). With additional validation, this method could have a significant cost-effective impact on the medical/surgical management of chest masses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)941-949
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Nuclear Medicine
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996

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Positron-Emission Tomography
Lung
Thorax
Fluorine
Deoxyglucose
Differential Diagnosis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Sensitivity and Specificity
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Differentiating benign from malignant lung lesions using 'quantitative' parameters of FDG PET images. / Hubner, Karl; Buonocore, Edward; Gould, Howard R.; Thie, Joe; Smith, Gary T.; Stephens, Shawn; Dickey, Jennifer.

In: Clinical Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 12, 01.12.1996, p. 941-949.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hubner, Karl ; Buonocore, Edward ; Gould, Howard R. ; Thie, Joe ; Smith, Gary T. ; Stephens, Shawn ; Dickey, Jennifer. / Differentiating benign from malignant lung lesions using 'quantitative' parameters of FDG PET images. In: Clinical Nuclear Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 941-949.
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