Direct posterior restorations

Clinical results and new developments

Juergen Manhart, Franklin Garcia-Godoy, Reinhard Hickel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The longevity of dental restorations is dependent on many different factors, including those related to materials, the dentist, and the patient. The main reasons for restoration failure are secondary caries, fracture of the bulk of the restoration or of the tooth, and marginal deficiencies and wear. The importance of direct-placement, aesthetic, tooth-colored restorative materials is still increasing. Amalgam restorations are being replaced because of alleged adverse health effects and inferior aesthetic appearance. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. Direct composite restorations require a time-consuming and more costly treatment procedure and are actually only indicated for patients with excellent oral hygiene. Glass ionomers can be considered only as long-term provisional restorations in stress-bearing posterior cavities. Future treatment regimens that are made possible by the development of sophisticated preparation techniques, improved dentin bonding agents, and resin-based restorative materials will result in the therapy of more small-sized lesions rather than large restorations. The importance of indirect inlay techniques will shift more and more toward the direct restoratives. As the cavities become smaller, it is to be expected that the use of improved direct restorative materials will provide excellent longevity even in stress-bearing situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-339
Number of pages37
JournalDental Clinics of North America
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tooth
Esthetics
Dentin-Bonding Agents
Inlays
Oral Hygiene
Dentists
Therapeutics
Health
glass ionomer

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Direct posterior restorations : Clinical results and new developments. / Manhart, Juergen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Hickel, Reinhard.

In: Dental Clinics of North America, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 303-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1727f93d35984f2cbe6158b40eeff733,
title = "Direct posterior restorations: Clinical results and new developments",
abstract = "The longevity of dental restorations is dependent on many different factors, including those related to materials, the dentist, and the patient. The main reasons for restoration failure are secondary caries, fracture of the bulk of the restoration or of the tooth, and marginal deficiencies and wear. The importance of direct-placement, aesthetic, tooth-colored restorative materials is still increasing. Amalgam restorations are being replaced because of alleged adverse health effects and inferior aesthetic appearance. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. Direct composite restorations require a time-consuming and more costly treatment procedure and are actually only indicated for patients with excellent oral hygiene. Glass ionomers can be considered only as long-term provisional restorations in stress-bearing posterior cavities. Future treatment regimens that are made possible by the development of sophisticated preparation techniques, improved dentin bonding agents, and resin-based restorative materials will result in the therapy of more small-sized lesions rather than large restorations. The importance of indirect inlay techniques will shift more and more toward the direct restoratives. As the cavities become smaller, it is to be expected that the use of improved direct restorative materials will provide excellent longevity even in stress-bearing situations.",
author = "Juergen Manhart and Franklin Garcia-Godoy and Reinhard Hickel",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0011-8532(01)00010-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "303--339",
journal = "Dental Clinics of North America",
issn = "0011-8532",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct posterior restorations

T2 - Clinical results and new developments

AU - Manhart, Juergen

AU - Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

AU - Hickel, Reinhard

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - The longevity of dental restorations is dependent on many different factors, including those related to materials, the dentist, and the patient. The main reasons for restoration failure are secondary caries, fracture of the bulk of the restoration or of the tooth, and marginal deficiencies and wear. The importance of direct-placement, aesthetic, tooth-colored restorative materials is still increasing. Amalgam restorations are being replaced because of alleged adverse health effects and inferior aesthetic appearance. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. Direct composite restorations require a time-consuming and more costly treatment procedure and are actually only indicated for patients with excellent oral hygiene. Glass ionomers can be considered only as long-term provisional restorations in stress-bearing posterior cavities. Future treatment regimens that are made possible by the development of sophisticated preparation techniques, improved dentin bonding agents, and resin-based restorative materials will result in the therapy of more small-sized lesions rather than large restorations. The importance of indirect inlay techniques will shift more and more toward the direct restoratives. As the cavities become smaller, it is to be expected that the use of improved direct restorative materials will provide excellent longevity even in stress-bearing situations.

AB - The longevity of dental restorations is dependent on many different factors, including those related to materials, the dentist, and the patient. The main reasons for restoration failure are secondary caries, fracture of the bulk of the restoration or of the tooth, and marginal deficiencies and wear. The importance of direct-placement, aesthetic, tooth-colored restorative materials is still increasing. Amalgam restorations are being replaced because of alleged adverse health effects and inferior aesthetic appearance. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. Direct composite restorations require a time-consuming and more costly treatment procedure and are actually only indicated for patients with excellent oral hygiene. Glass ionomers can be considered only as long-term provisional restorations in stress-bearing posterior cavities. Future treatment regimens that are made possible by the development of sophisticated preparation techniques, improved dentin bonding agents, and resin-based restorative materials will result in the therapy of more small-sized lesions rather than large restorations. The importance of indirect inlay techniques will shift more and more toward the direct restoratives. As the cavities become smaller, it is to be expected that the use of improved direct restorative materials will provide excellent longevity even in stress-bearing situations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036547384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036547384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0011-8532(01)00010-6

DO - 10.1016/S0011-8532(01)00010-6

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 303

EP - 339

JO - Dental Clinics of North America

JF - Dental Clinics of North America

SN - 0011-8532

IS - 2

ER -