Disciplinary split

A threat to geriatrics interdisciplinary team training

David B. Reuben, Lené Levy-Storms, Misty N. Yee, Ming Lee, Kenneth Cole, Martha Waite, Linda Nichols, Janet C. Frank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1995, the John A. Hartford Foundation launched an initiative to strengthen geriatric interdisciplinary team training (GITT) for advanced practice nursing and masters-level social work students and residents in internal medicine and family practice. As part of the national evaluation of the initiative, case-study and cross-case designs were employed using quantitative and qualitative data to examine the influence of cultures, regulations, and attitudes of individual disciplines on interdisciplinary training efforts at the first eight GITT programs. This evaluation found that attitudinal and cultural traditions of the different health professions faculty and students (disciplinary split) remain as important obstacles to creating an optimal interdisciplinary team-training experience. In general, physician trainees participated least enthusiastically in GITT. In part, this lower level of enthusiasm may have been the result of inconsistent medicine faculty support of the program. At all but one program, physician trainees also had shorter GITT training experiences than other disciplines. In addition, the disparity in level of training by discipline of GITT participants may have contributed to attitudinal barriers to interdisciplinary training. Discipline-specific regulatory and accreditation barriers also impede interdisciplinary training. Nevertheless, GITT experiences at some clinical sites, especially home visits, appeared to promote interdisciplinary training. Some barriers to creating and implementing GITT programs may be best approached at the level of accrediting agencies and certifying organizations. Others will require local and national efforts of leaders in the different disciplines to model and support good team care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1000-1006
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

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Geriatrics
Advanced Practice Nursing
Students
Physicians
Education
Health Occupations
House Calls
Family Practice
Accreditation
Internal Medicine
Social Work
Medicine
Organizations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Reuben, D. B., Levy-Storms, L., Yee, M. N., Lee, M., Cole, K., Waite, M., ... Frank, J. C. (2004). Disciplinary split: A threat to geriatrics interdisciplinary team training. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 52(6), 1000-1006. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2004.52272.x

Disciplinary split : A threat to geriatrics interdisciplinary team training. / Reuben, David B.; Levy-Storms, Lené; Yee, Misty N.; Lee, Ming; Cole, Kenneth; Waite, Martha; Nichols, Linda; Frank, Janet C.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 52, No. 6, 01.06.2004, p. 1000-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reuben, DB, Levy-Storms, L, Yee, MN, Lee, M, Cole, K, Waite, M, Nichols, L & Frank, JC 2004, 'Disciplinary split: A threat to geriatrics interdisciplinary team training', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 1000-1006. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2004.52272.x
Reuben, David B. ; Levy-Storms, Lené ; Yee, Misty N. ; Lee, Ming ; Cole, Kenneth ; Waite, Martha ; Nichols, Linda ; Frank, Janet C. / Disciplinary split : A threat to geriatrics interdisciplinary team training. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2004 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 1000-1006.
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