Disparities in prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers in medicaid

C. Daniel Mullins, Jesse L. Cooke, Junling Wang, Fadia T. Shaya, Doren Van Hsu, Sandra Brooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Given previous reports of variations in prevalence of cancer in low-income individuals, we sought to determine if disparities in cancer prevalence existed in a similarly-insured Medicaid population. Methods: Using Maryland Medicaid administrative claims data, prevalence rates of lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were calculated for Maryland Medicaid recipients who were continuously eligible during the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2000. Chi-squared tests were used to test the differences across subgroups. Cancer prevalence data were age-adjusted using Maryland Medicaid enrollees as the standard population. Results: The care prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were 75/10,000, 63/10,000, 92/10,000, and 45/10,000, respectively. These rates were 1.2 to 5.2 times those reported at the national level. Generally, higher cancer prevalence rates in certain racial groups in Maryland Medicaid were consistent with previous studies. Regional differences in cancer prevalence existed for each cancer studied. Conclusions: Limiting our study sample to a population of uniformly low socioeconomic individuals did not eliminate the disparity in prevalence rates between blacks and whites. Different patterns of racial disparity across regions reported by previous researchers might be due to small area variation in addition to socioeconomic status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)809-816
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume96
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medicaid
Colorectal Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Small-Area Analysis
Population
Social Class
Research Personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mullins, C. D., Cooke, J. L., Wang, J., Shaya, F. T., Van Hsu, D., & Brooks, S. (2004). Disparities in prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers in medicaid. Journal of the National Medical Association, 96(6), 809-816.

Disparities in prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers in medicaid. / Mullins, C. Daniel; Cooke, Jesse L.; Wang, Junling; Shaya, Fadia T.; Van Hsu, Doren; Brooks, Sandra.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 96, No. 6, 01.06.2004, p. 809-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mullins, CD, Cooke, JL, Wang, J, Shaya, FT, Van Hsu, D & Brooks, S 2004, 'Disparities in prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers in medicaid', Journal of the National Medical Association, vol. 96, no. 6, pp. 809-816.
Mullins, C. Daniel ; Cooke, Jesse L. ; Wang, Junling ; Shaya, Fadia T. ; Van Hsu, Doren ; Brooks, Sandra. / Disparities in prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers in medicaid. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 2004 ; Vol. 96, No. 6. pp. 809-816.
@article{607121caa6dd41e5a920d37516a92e11,
title = "Disparities in prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers in medicaid",
abstract = "Background: Given previous reports of variations in prevalence of cancer in low-income individuals, we sought to determine if disparities in cancer prevalence existed in a similarly-insured Medicaid population. Methods: Using Maryland Medicaid administrative claims data, prevalence rates of lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were calculated for Maryland Medicaid recipients who were continuously eligible during the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2000. Chi-squared tests were used to test the differences across subgroups. Cancer prevalence data were age-adjusted using Maryland Medicaid enrollees as the standard population. Results: The care prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were 75/10,000, 63/10,000, 92/10,000, and 45/10,000, respectively. These rates were 1.2 to 5.2 times those reported at the national level. Generally, higher cancer prevalence rates in certain racial groups in Maryland Medicaid were consistent with previous studies. Regional differences in cancer prevalence existed for each cancer studied. Conclusions: Limiting our study sample to a population of uniformly low socioeconomic individuals did not eliminate the disparity in prevalence rates between blacks and whites. Different patterns of racial disparity across regions reported by previous researchers might be due to small area variation in addition to socioeconomic status.",
author = "Mullins, {C. Daniel} and Cooke, {Jesse L.} and Junling Wang and Shaya, {Fadia T.} and {Van Hsu}, Doren and Sandra Brooks",
year = "2004",
month = "6",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "809--816",
journal = "Journal of the National Medical Association",
issn = "1943-4693",
publisher = "National Medical Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disparities in prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers in medicaid

AU - Mullins, C. Daniel

AU - Cooke, Jesse L.

AU - Wang, Junling

AU - Shaya, Fadia T.

AU - Van Hsu, Doren

AU - Brooks, Sandra

PY - 2004/6/1

Y1 - 2004/6/1

N2 - Background: Given previous reports of variations in prevalence of cancer in low-income individuals, we sought to determine if disparities in cancer prevalence existed in a similarly-insured Medicaid population. Methods: Using Maryland Medicaid administrative claims data, prevalence rates of lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were calculated for Maryland Medicaid recipients who were continuously eligible during the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2000. Chi-squared tests were used to test the differences across subgroups. Cancer prevalence data were age-adjusted using Maryland Medicaid enrollees as the standard population. Results: The care prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were 75/10,000, 63/10,000, 92/10,000, and 45/10,000, respectively. These rates were 1.2 to 5.2 times those reported at the national level. Generally, higher cancer prevalence rates in certain racial groups in Maryland Medicaid were consistent with previous studies. Regional differences in cancer prevalence existed for each cancer studied. Conclusions: Limiting our study sample to a population of uniformly low socioeconomic individuals did not eliminate the disparity in prevalence rates between blacks and whites. Different patterns of racial disparity across regions reported by previous researchers might be due to small area variation in addition to socioeconomic status.

AB - Background: Given previous reports of variations in prevalence of cancer in low-income individuals, we sought to determine if disparities in cancer prevalence existed in a similarly-insured Medicaid population. Methods: Using Maryland Medicaid administrative claims data, prevalence rates of lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were calculated for Maryland Medicaid recipients who were continuously eligible during the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2000. Chi-squared tests were used to test the differences across subgroups. Cancer prevalence data were age-adjusted using Maryland Medicaid enrollees as the standard population. Results: The care prevalence rates for lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers were 75/10,000, 63/10,000, 92/10,000, and 45/10,000, respectively. These rates were 1.2 to 5.2 times those reported at the national level. Generally, higher cancer prevalence rates in certain racial groups in Maryland Medicaid were consistent with previous studies. Regional differences in cancer prevalence existed for each cancer studied. Conclusions: Limiting our study sample to a population of uniformly low socioeconomic individuals did not eliminate the disparity in prevalence rates between blacks and whites. Different patterns of racial disparity across regions reported by previous researchers might be due to small area variation in addition to socioeconomic status.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2942618415&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2942618415&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 96

SP - 809

EP - 816

JO - Journal of the National Medical Association

JF - Journal of the National Medical Association

SN - 1943-4693

IS - 6

ER -