Disparities in use of gynecologic oncologists for women with ovarian cancer in the United States

Shamly Austin, Michelle Martin, Yongin Kim, Ellen M. Funkhouser, Edward E. Partridge, Maria Pisu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine disparities in utilization of gynecologic oncologists (GOs) across race and other sociodemographic factors for women with ovarian cancer. Data Sources Obtained SEER-Medicare linked dataset for 4,233 non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic African American, Hispanic of any race, and Non-Hispanic Asian women aged ≥66 years old diagnosed with ovarian cancer during 2000-2002 from 17 SEER registries. Physician specialty was identified by linking data to the AMA master file using Unique Physician Identification Numbers. Study Design Retrospective claims data analysis for 1999-2006. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between GO utilization and race/ethnicity in the initial, continuing, and final phases of care. Principal Findings GO use decreased from the initial to final phase of care (51.4-28.8 percent). No racial/ethnic differences were found overall and by phase of cancer care. Women >70 years old and those with unstaged disease were less likely to receive GO care compared to their counterparts. GO use was lower in some SEER registries compared to the Atlanta registry. Conclusions GO use for the initial ovarian cancer treatment or for longer term care was low but not different across racial/ethnic groups. Future research should identify factors that affect GO utilization and understand why use of these specialists remains low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1135-1153
Number of pages19
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

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Ovarian Neoplasms
Registries
Logistic Models
Insurance Claim Review
Physicians
Information Storage and Retrieval
Long-Term Care
Medicare
Oncologists
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Retrospective Studies
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

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Disparities in use of gynecologic oncologists for women with ovarian cancer in the United States. / Austin, Shamly; Martin, Michelle; Kim, Yongin; Funkhouser, Ellen M.; Partridge, Edward E.; Pisu, Maria.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 48, No. 3, 01.06.2013, p. 1135-1153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Austin, Shamly ; Martin, Michelle ; Kim, Yongin ; Funkhouser, Ellen M. ; Partridge, Edward E. ; Pisu, Maria. / Disparities in use of gynecologic oncologists for women with ovarian cancer in the United States. In: Health Services Research. 2013 ; Vol. 48, No. 3. pp. 1135-1153.
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