Disparity between symptomatic and physiologic outcomes following esophageal lengthening procedures for antireflux surgery

Edward Lin, Vickie Swafford, Rajagopal Chadalavada, Bruce Ramshaw, C. Daniel Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although esophageal lengthening procedures (Collis gastroplasty) have been recommended as an adjunct to antireflux surgery in patients with shortened esophagus, there are few data on physiologic outcomes in these patients. This study details the long-term outcomes in patients who underwent antireflux surgery with Collis gastroplasty. All patients undergoing esophagogastric fundoplication (EGF) with a Collis gastroplasty for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease or paraesophageal hernia were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Symptom questionnaires were used during follow-up to assess symptomatic outcomes. Barium esophogram, upper endoscopy with biopsy, and catheterless esophageal acid monitoring (BRAVO system) were recommended for all patients. Patients with abnormal results of physiologic studies underwent further treatment based on a standardized algorithm. Between 1996 and 2002, a total of 68 patients underwent EGF with Collis gastroplasty. Twenty-seven (40%) had a large paraesophageal hernia, and 20 (30%) had undergone a prior EGF. Fifty-six (82%) of the procedures were performed laparoscopically. Mean follow-up time was 30 months, with 10 (15%) patients lost to latest follow-up. Symptomatic outcome data were available for 85% of patients, with significant improvements reported for heartburn (86%), chest pain (90%), dysphagia (89%), and regurgitation (91%). Most patients (84%) were off medications. Physiologic data were completed in 37% of the patients. Of those undergoing physiologic follow-up studies, 17% had recurrent hiatal hernia, and 80% had endoscopically identified esophagitis and pathologic esophageal acid exposure on pH testing. Despite this, 65% of the patients with objectively identified abnormalities reported significant symptomatic improvement compared to their preoperative symptoms. Two patients developed changes associated with Barrett's esophagus that were not present preoperatively. Distal esophageal injury can persist after EGF with Collis gastroplasty, despite significant symptomatic improvements. Appropriate follow-up in these patients requires objective surveillance, which should eventuate in further treatment if esophageal acid is not completely controlled. Although the Collis gastroplasty is conceptually appealing, these results call into question the liberal application of this technique during EGF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-39
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Gastroplasty
Fundoplication
Hiatal Hernia
Acids
Heartburn
Barrett Esophagus
Esophagitis
Lost to Follow-Up
Barium
Deglutition Disorders
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Chest Pain
Esophagus
Endoscopy
Databases
Biopsy
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Disparity between symptomatic and physiologic outcomes following esophageal lengthening procedures for antireflux surgery. / Lin, Edward; Swafford, Vickie; Chadalavada, Rajagopal; Ramshaw, Bruce; Smith, C. Daniel.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 31-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Edward ; Swafford, Vickie ; Chadalavada, Rajagopal ; Ramshaw, Bruce ; Smith, C. Daniel. / Disparity between symptomatic and physiologic outcomes following esophageal lengthening procedures for antireflux surgery. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 31-39.
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