Disrupted Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dynamics, Mitophagy, and Biogenesis during Cancer Cachexia

A Role for Inflammation

Brandon N. Vanderveen, Dennis K. Fix, James Carson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of cancer cachexia in both patients and preclinical models. Cachexia is prevalent in roughly 80% of cancer patients and accounts for up to 20% of all cancer-related deaths. Proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β have been widely examined for their regulation of cancer cachexia. An established characteristic of cachectic skeletal muscle is a disrupted capacity for oxidative metabolism, which is thought to contribute to cancer patient fatigue, diminished metabolic function, and muscle mass loss. This review's primary objective is to highlight emerging evidence linking cancer-induced inflammation to the dysfunctional regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, and biogenesis in cachectic muscle. The potential for either muscle inactivity or exercise to alter mitochondrial dysfunction during cancer cachexia will also be discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3292087
JournalOxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume2017
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Mitochondrial Degradation
Mitochondrial Dynamics
Cachexia
Organelle Biogenesis
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Inflammation
Neoplasms
Muscles
Metabolism
Interleukin-6
Fatigue of materials
Cytokines
Fatigue
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Aging
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Disrupted Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Dynamics, Mitophagy, and Biogenesis during Cancer Cachexia : A Role for Inflammation. / Vanderveen, Brandon N.; Fix, Dennis K.; Carson, James.

In: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Vol. 2017, 3292087, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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