Dissociation Between Cardiovascular Risk Markers and Clinical Outcomes in African Americans

Need for Greater Mechanistic Insight

Ibiayi Dagogo-Jack, Samuel Dagogo-Jack

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite having distinct advantages, such as lower serum triglycerides, higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, and less visceral adiposity, African Americans suffer disproportionately from cardiovascular disease (CVD). In African Americans, attention often focuses on two cardiometabolic risk factors-hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus-because they occur more frequently in African Americans than whites. Exactly how hypertension and hyperglycemia appear to override benefits from the lower prevalence of dyslipidemia and other factors is unknown. From a practical viewpoint, as the combined effects of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus are dominant, then primary prevention with vigorous control of these conditions must be of utmost priority. However, because attention is focused on hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, the role of other potential risk factors, such as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol oxidation, HDL cholesterol function, lipoxygenase pathway, endothelial progenitor cells, and natriuretic peptide regulation, have not been well studied. In this review, we discuss the paradox of CVD morbidity and mortality among African Americans and offer suggestions for future investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-206
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Cardiovascular Risk Reports
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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African Americans
Biomarkers
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Hypertension
HDL Cholesterol
Cardiovascular Diseases
Natriuretic Peptides
Lipoxygenase
Adiposity
Primary Prevention
Dyslipidemias
Hyperglycemia
LDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Morbidity
Mortality
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Dissociation Between Cardiovascular Risk Markers and Clinical Outcomes in African Americans : Need for Greater Mechanistic Insight. / Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel.

In: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.12.2011, p. 200-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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