Do birds possess homologues of mammalian primary visual, somatosensory and motor cortices?

Loreta Medina, Anton Reiner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

266 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent data on the expression of several homeobox genes in the embryonic telencephalon of mammals, birds and reptiles support the homology of a part of the avian pallium, named the Wulst, and at least the more-medial and superior parts of mammalian neocortex. This conclusion is also supported by previous embryological, topological and hodological data. Furthermore, new evidence on the connections and electrophysiological properties of specific subfields within the avian Wulst, and on the thalamic territories that project to these fields, supports the more-specific conclusion that a primary visual area and a primary somatosensory-somatomotor area are present in the avian Wulst; these areas are likely to be homologous to their counterparts in mammals. In spite of this, developmental, morphological and comparative evidence indicate that some structural and physiological traits that appear to be similar in the Wulst and neocortex (such as the lamination or binocularity) evolved independently in birds and mammals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalTrends in Neurosciences
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Somatosensory Cortex
Motor Cortex
Visual Cortex
Birds
Mammals
Neocortex
Telencephalon
Reptiles
Homeobox Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Do birds possess homologues of mammalian primary visual, somatosensory and motor cortices? / Medina, Loreta; Reiner, Anton.

In: Trends in Neurosciences, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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