Do Electronic Cigarettes Have a Role in Tobacco Cessation?

Andrea Franks, Karen Sando, Sarah McBane

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Tobacco use continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Even with behavioral and pharmacologic treatment, long-term tobacco cessation rates are low. Electronic nicotine delivery systems, commonly referred to as electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes, are increasingly used for tobacco cessation. Because e-cigarettes are widely used in this setting, health care professionals need to know if they are safe and effective. The purpose of this article is to review literature regarding use of e-cigarettes as a tool for tobacco cessation in patients who are ready to quit, as well as those who are not ready to quit, along with some selected patient populations. The safety and clinical implications of e-cigarette use are also reviewed. Small, short-term studies assessing smokers’ use of e-cigarettes suggest that e-cigarettes may be well tolerated and modestly effective in achieving abstinence. High-quality studies are lacking to support e-cigarettes use for cessation in patients with mental health issues. One small prospective cohort study concluded that patients with mental health issues reduced cigarette use with e-cigarette use. Although one study found that patients with cancer reported using e-cigarettes as a tobacco-cessation strategy, e-cigarettes were not effective in supporting abstinence 6 and 12 months later. Additional research is needed to evaluate the use of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation in patients with pulmonary diseases. No data exist to describe the efficacy of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation in pregnant women. Although study subjects report minimal adverse effects with e-cigarettes and the incidence of adverse effects decreases over time, long-term safety data are lacking. Health care providers should assess e-cigarette use in their patients as part of the tobacco cessation process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-568
Number of pages14
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation
Tobacco Products
Smoking Cessation
Electronic Cigarettes
Mental Health
Smoking
Safety
Tobacco Use
Nicotine
Health Personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Do Electronic Cigarettes Have a Role in Tobacco Cessation? / Franks, Andrea; Sando, Karen; McBane, Sarah.

In: Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 555-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Franks, Andrea ; Sando, Karen ; McBane, Sarah. / Do Electronic Cigarettes Have a Role in Tobacco Cessation?. In: Pharmacotherapy. 2018 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 555-568.
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