Do Overweight and Obese Pediatric Stone Formers Have Differences in Metabolic Abnormalities Compared With Normal-weight Stone Formers?

Gina M. Cambareri, Dana Giel, Aaron P. Bayne, Sean Corbett, Elleson Schurtz, Larisa Kovacevic, Troy Sukhu, Michael Yap, George Chiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine if 24-hour urinary parameters in children with nephrolithiasis across 4 institutions were influenced by body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods The 24-hour urinary parameters obtained from children with nephrolithiasis between 2000 and 2013 were stratified by BMI percentile ≥85th and <85th (overweight and obese patients vs healthy weight, respectively). A total of 206 children were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included patients with a history of spina bifida, neurogenic bladder, and cerebral palsy, and patients on medical treatment before the first 24-hour urine collection. Results Overweight and obese patients consisted of 35.4% of the cohort (n = 73). Metabolic abnormalities were present in 130 children (63.1%). The most common abnormality present in the <85th percentile was hypercalciuria (32.3%), and in the ≥85th percentile, hyperoxaluria (37.0%). Univariable and multivariable analyses revealed that overweight and obese children were more likely to have low urinary volume and elevated uric acid compared to normal-weight children. Conclusion Although there is a link between stone formation and BMI in adults, no definitive conclusions have been proven in the pediatric literature. Our study indicates that stone-forming children who are overweight or obese have low urinary volume and elevated uric acid compared to normal-weight stone-forming children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume101
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Pediatrics
Weights and Measures
Nephrolithiasis
Body Mass Index
Uric Acid
Hyperoxaluria
Hypercalciuria
Neurogenic Urinary Bladder
Urine Specimen Collection
Spinal Dysraphism
Cerebral Palsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Do Overweight and Obese Pediatric Stone Formers Have Differences in Metabolic Abnormalities Compared With Normal-weight Stone Formers? / Cambareri, Gina M.; Giel, Dana; Bayne, Aaron P.; Corbett, Sean; Schurtz, Elleson; Kovacevic, Larisa; Sukhu, Troy; Yap, Michael; Chiang, George.

In: Urology, Vol. 101, 01.03.2017, p. 26-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cambareri, Gina M. ; Giel, Dana ; Bayne, Aaron P. ; Corbett, Sean ; Schurtz, Elleson ; Kovacevic, Larisa ; Sukhu, Troy ; Yap, Michael ; Chiang, George. / Do Overweight and Obese Pediatric Stone Formers Have Differences in Metabolic Abnormalities Compared With Normal-weight Stone Formers?. In: Urology. 2017 ; Vol. 101. pp. 26-30.
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N2 - Objective To determine if 24-hour urinary parameters in children with nephrolithiasis across 4 institutions were influenced by body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods The 24-hour urinary parameters obtained from children with nephrolithiasis between 2000 and 2013 were stratified by BMI percentile ≥85th and <85th (overweight and obese patients vs healthy weight, respectively). A total of 206 children were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included patients with a history of spina bifida, neurogenic bladder, and cerebral palsy, and patients on medical treatment before the first 24-hour urine collection. Results Overweight and obese patients consisted of 35.4% of the cohort (n = 73). Metabolic abnormalities were present in 130 children (63.1%). The most common abnormality present in the <85th percentile was hypercalciuria (32.3%), and in the ≥85th percentile, hyperoxaluria (37.0%). Univariable and multivariable analyses revealed that overweight and obese children were more likely to have low urinary volume and elevated uric acid compared to normal-weight children. Conclusion Although there is a link between stone formation and BMI in adults, no definitive conclusions have been proven in the pediatric literature. Our study indicates that stone-forming children who are overweight or obese have low urinary volume and elevated uric acid compared to normal-weight stone-forming children.

AB - Objective To determine if 24-hour urinary parameters in children with nephrolithiasis across 4 institutions were influenced by body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods The 24-hour urinary parameters obtained from children with nephrolithiasis between 2000 and 2013 were stratified by BMI percentile ≥85th and <85th (overweight and obese patients vs healthy weight, respectively). A total of 206 children were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included patients with a history of spina bifida, neurogenic bladder, and cerebral palsy, and patients on medical treatment before the first 24-hour urine collection. Results Overweight and obese patients consisted of 35.4% of the cohort (n = 73). Metabolic abnormalities were present in 130 children (63.1%). The most common abnormality present in the <85th percentile was hypercalciuria (32.3%), and in the ≥85th percentile, hyperoxaluria (37.0%). Univariable and multivariable analyses revealed that overweight and obese children were more likely to have low urinary volume and elevated uric acid compared to normal-weight children. Conclusion Although there is a link between stone formation and BMI in adults, no definitive conclusions have been proven in the pediatric literature. Our study indicates that stone-forming children who are overweight or obese have low urinary volume and elevated uric acid compared to normal-weight stone-forming children.

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