Do specific virus-bacteria pairings drive clinical outcomes of pneumonia?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacterial pneumonia is a common contributor to severe outcomes of influenza. Epidemiological data suggest that the incidence, severity and associated bacterial pathogens differ between epidemics and by geographical location within epidemics. Data from animal models demonstrate that differences in both viral and bacterial strains alter the incidence and outcomes of pneumonia. For influenza viruses, evolutionary changes to specific virulence factors appear to alter the ability of viruses within particular lineages to prime the host for secondary bacterial infection. Although bacterial strains differ considerably in disease potential in the setting of viral co-infection, the bacterial virulence factors underlying this finding are currently unknown. The hypothesis that geographical variation exists in the prevalence of bacterial strains expressing factors that enable efficient disease potentiation during viral epidemics should be considered as one explanation for regional differences in severity. This would have implications for surveillance, vaccine development, and the conduct of clinical trials for the prevention or treatment of pneumonia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-118
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Pneumonia
Virulence Factors
Viruses
Bacteria
Coinfection
Bacterial Pneumonia
Incidence
Virus Diseases
Orthomyxoviridae
Bacterial Infections
Human Influenza
Vaccines
Animal Models
Clinical Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Do specific virus-bacteria pairings drive clinical outcomes of pneumonia? / Mccullers, Jonathan.

In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.01.2013, p. 113-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{3250516f908343f28a7302d2e55f66a1,
title = "Do specific virus-bacteria pairings drive clinical outcomes of pneumonia?",
abstract = "Bacterial pneumonia is a common contributor to severe outcomes of influenza. Epidemiological data suggest that the incidence, severity and associated bacterial pathogens differ between epidemics and by geographical location within epidemics. Data from animal models demonstrate that differences in both viral and bacterial strains alter the incidence and outcomes of pneumonia. For influenza viruses, evolutionary changes to specific virulence factors appear to alter the ability of viruses within particular lineages to prime the host for secondary bacterial infection. Although bacterial strains differ considerably in disease potential in the setting of viral co-infection, the bacterial virulence factors underlying this finding are currently unknown. The hypothesis that geographical variation exists in the prevalence of bacterial strains expressing factors that enable efficient disease potentiation during viral epidemics should be considered as one explanation for regional differences in severity. This would have implications for surveillance, vaccine development, and the conduct of clinical trials for the prevention or treatment of pneumonia.",
author = "Jonathan Mccullers",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/1469-0691.12093",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "113--118",
journal = "Clinical Microbiology and Infection",
issn = "1198-743X",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do specific virus-bacteria pairings drive clinical outcomes of pneumonia?

AU - Mccullers, Jonathan

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Bacterial pneumonia is a common contributor to severe outcomes of influenza. Epidemiological data suggest that the incidence, severity and associated bacterial pathogens differ between epidemics and by geographical location within epidemics. Data from animal models demonstrate that differences in both viral and bacterial strains alter the incidence and outcomes of pneumonia. For influenza viruses, evolutionary changes to specific virulence factors appear to alter the ability of viruses within particular lineages to prime the host for secondary bacterial infection. Although bacterial strains differ considerably in disease potential in the setting of viral co-infection, the bacterial virulence factors underlying this finding are currently unknown. The hypothesis that geographical variation exists in the prevalence of bacterial strains expressing factors that enable efficient disease potentiation during viral epidemics should be considered as one explanation for regional differences in severity. This would have implications for surveillance, vaccine development, and the conduct of clinical trials for the prevention or treatment of pneumonia.

AB - Bacterial pneumonia is a common contributor to severe outcomes of influenza. Epidemiological data suggest that the incidence, severity and associated bacterial pathogens differ between epidemics and by geographical location within epidemics. Data from animal models demonstrate that differences in both viral and bacterial strains alter the incidence and outcomes of pneumonia. For influenza viruses, evolutionary changes to specific virulence factors appear to alter the ability of viruses within particular lineages to prime the host for secondary bacterial infection. Although bacterial strains differ considerably in disease potential in the setting of viral co-infection, the bacterial virulence factors underlying this finding are currently unknown. The hypothesis that geographical variation exists in the prevalence of bacterial strains expressing factors that enable efficient disease potentiation during viral epidemics should be considered as one explanation for regional differences in severity. This would have implications for surveillance, vaccine development, and the conduct of clinical trials for the prevention or treatment of pneumonia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84873515381&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84873515381&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1469-0691.12093

DO - 10.1111/1469-0691.12093

M3 - Review article

VL - 19

SP - 113

EP - 118

JO - Clinical Microbiology and Infection

JF - Clinical Microbiology and Infection

SN - 1198-743X

IS - 2

ER -