Do the holidays impact weight and self-weighing behaviour among adults engaged in a behavioural weight loss intervention?

Margaret C. Fahey, Robert C. Klesges, Mehmet Kocak, Jiajing Wang, Gerald W. Talcott, Rebecca Krukowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the U.S. holiday period impact on weight gain, self-weighing, and treatment success among adults in a weight loss intervention (N = 171). Using electronic scales, body weight and self-weighing frequency were compared by time period [i.e., pre-holiday, holiday (November 15–January 1), post-holiday]. Self-weighing was less frequent during holiday period (p < .01), and longer intervention engagement was associated with weight gain (p < .0001) during this time. Enrollment during holiday period was associated with 2.3% 12-month weight loss. Holiday period enrollment might be beneficial for preventing holiday weight gain and facilitating successful intervention outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-397
Number of pages3
JournalObesity Research and Clinical Practice
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Holidays
Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
Weight Gain
Body Weight

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Do the holidays impact weight and self-weighing behaviour among adults engaged in a behavioural weight loss intervention? / Fahey, Margaret C.; Klesges, Robert C.; Kocak, Mehmet; Wang, Jiajing; Talcott, Gerald W.; Krukowski, Rebecca.

In: Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.07.2019, p. 395-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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