Do we believe the tobacco industry lied to us? Association with smoking behavior in a military population

Robert Klesges, Deborah A. Sherrill-Mittleman, Margaret Debon, Gerald Talcott, Robert J. Vanecek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the dangers of smoking, tobacco companies continue to impede tobacco control efforts through deceptive marketing practices. Media campaigns that expose these practices have been effective in advancing anti-industry attitudes and reducing smoking initiation among young people, yet the association between knowledge of industry practices and smoking cessation and relapse has not been studied. In a large military sample entering Air Force Basic Military Training (BMT), where tobacco use is prohibited, we investigated (i) the prevalence of agreement with a statement that tobacco companies have misled the public about the health consequences of smoking and (ii) the association of this acknowledgement with smoking status upon entry into BMT (N=36 013). At baseline, 56.6% agreed that tobacco companies have been deceptive, and agreement was a strong predictor of smoking status [smokers less likely to agree, odds ratio (OR)=0.39, P < 0.01]. At 12-month follow-up, we examined the association between industry perception at baseline and current smoking status (N=20 672). Recruits who had been smoking upon entry into BMT and who had acknowledged industry deception were less likely to report current smoking (OR=0.84, P=0.01). These findings suggest that anti-industry attitudes may affect smoking relapse following cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-921
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 16 2009

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Tobacco Industry
nicotine
smoking
Smoking
Military
industry
Industry
Population
Tobacco
relapse
Odds Ratio
Recurrence
Tobacco Use
air force
Smoking Cessation
health consequences
Deception
Marketing
Public Health
Air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Do we believe the tobacco industry lied to us? Association with smoking behavior in a military population. / Klesges, Robert; Sherrill-Mittleman, Deborah A.; Debon, Margaret; Talcott, Gerald; Vanecek, Robert J.

In: Health Education Research, Vol. 24, No. 6, 16.12.2009, p. 909-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, R, Sherrill-Mittleman, DA, Debon, M, Talcott, G & Vanecek, RJ 2009, 'Do we believe the tobacco industry lied to us? Association with smoking behavior in a military population', Health Education Research, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 909-921. https://doi.org/10.1093/her/cyp029
Klesges, Robert ; Sherrill-Mittleman, Deborah A. ; Debon, Margaret ; Talcott, Gerald ; Vanecek, Robert J. / Do we believe the tobacco industry lied to us? Association with smoking behavior in a military population. In: Health Education Research. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 909-921.
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