Does neonatal management affect the incidence of grade iii and iv intraventricular hemorrhage?

R. Bombrake, Craig Towers, L. Padilla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The study of the effect of neonatal management practices on the development of Grade III and IV intraventricular hemorrhages (SIVH) is complicated by differences in patient populations, perinatal management, and neonatal management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether different neonatal management practices may affect the incidence of Grade III and IV IVH in a tertiär) referral center while the patient population and perinatal management approach remained constant. STUDY DESIGN: All admissions from 6/1/92 to 12/31/95 to the NICU of inborn infants with hirthweights between 500 and 1550 grams and 24 weeks GA were identified. During this same time period all cases of Grade III and IV I\T-I were located by review of NICU log books, medical record discharge diagnoses, and the hospital ultrasound computer data base. During the three-and-a-half year period the patient population and perinatal management remained unchanged; however, two distinct neonatal management approaches occurred during two clear cut time frames. Neonatal Management Approach A was in place for 7 months and was preceded and followed immediately by Management Approach B lor a period of 17 and 18 months respectively. RESULTS: Management #SIVH/<1550 g donates #SIVH/< 1200 g Xeonates Group A 10/77 (13.0%) 8/47 (17.0%) Group B 22/387 (5.7%) 19/239 (7.9%) p value £CI p = 0.039 1.04-5.79 p = 0.095 0.88-6.25 The mean birthweight and gestational age for Management Approach A was 934 g and 27 weeks respectively; and 878 g and 26 weeks for Management Approach B. The main differences in neonatal management approach involved initial fluid management, electrolyte management, and possibly initial ven tali tory management. CONCLUSIONS: In a unique setting where patient population and antepartum and intrapartum obstetrical management remained constant, it appears that neonatal management may impact the incidence of severe IVH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalActa Diabetologica Latina
Volume176
Issue number1 PART II
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hemorrhage
Practice Management
Incidence
Population
Talus
antineoplaston A10
Electrolytes
Gestational Age
Medical Records
Referral and Consultation
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

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Does neonatal management affect the incidence of grade iii and iv intraventricular hemorrhage? / Bombrake, R.; Towers, Craig; Padilla, L.

In: Acta Diabetologica Latina, Vol. 176, No. 1 PART II, 1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The study of the effect of neonatal management practices on the development of Grade III and IV intraventricular hemorrhages (SIVH) is complicated by differences in patient populations, perinatal management, and neonatal management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether different neonatal management practices may affect the incidence of Grade III and IV IVH in a terti{\"a}r) referral center while the patient population and perinatal management approach remained constant. STUDY DESIGN: All admissions from 6/1/92 to 12/31/95 to the NICU of inborn infants with hirthweights between 500 and 1550 grams and 24 weeks GA were identified. During this same time period all cases of Grade III and IV I\T-I were located by review of NICU log books, medical record discharge diagnoses, and the hospital ultrasound computer data base. During the three-and-a-half year period the patient population and perinatal management remained unchanged; however, two distinct neonatal management approaches occurred during two clear cut time frames. Neonatal Management Approach A was in place for 7 months and was preceded and followed immediately by Management Approach B lor a period of 17 and 18 months respectively. RESULTS: Management #SIVH/<1550 g donates #SIVH/< 1200 g Xeonates Group A 10/77 (13.0{\%}) 8/47 (17.0{\%}) Group B 22/387 (5.7{\%}) 19/239 (7.9{\%}) p value £CI p = 0.039 1.04-5.79 p = 0.095 0.88-6.25 The mean birthweight and gestational age for Management Approach A was 934 g and 27 weeks respectively; and 878 g and 26 weeks for Management Approach B. The main differences in neonatal management approach involved initial fluid management, electrolyte management, and possibly initial ven tali tory management. CONCLUSIONS: In a unique setting where patient population and antepartum and intrapartum obstetrical management remained constant, it appears that neonatal management may impact the incidence of severe IVH.",
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