Does pathology of small venules contribute to cerebral microinfarcts and dementia?

David A. Hartmann, Hyacinth I. Hyacinth, Francesca-Fang Liao, Andy Y. Shih

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microinfarcts are small, but strikingly common, ischemic brain lesions in the aging human brain. There is mounting evidence that microinfarcts contribute to vascular cognitive impairment and dementia, but the origins of microinfarcts are unclear. Understanding the vascular pathologies that cause microinfarcts may yield strategies to prevent their occurrence and reduce their deleterious effects on brain function. Current thinking suggests that cortical microinfarcts arise from the occlusion of penetrating arterioles, which are responsible for delivering oxygenated blood to small volumes of tissue. Unexpectedly, pre-clinical studies have shown that the occlusion of penetrating venules, which drain deoxygenated blood from cortex, lead to microinfarcts that appear identical to those resulting from arteriole occlusion. Here we discuss the idea that cerebral venule pathology could be an overlooked source for brain microinfarcts in humans. (Figure presented.). This article is part of the Special Issue “Vascular Dementia”. Cover Image for this Issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.14167.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-526
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume144
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Venules
Pathology
Dementia
Brain
Arterioles
Blood Vessels
Blood
Vascular Dementia
Mountings
Aging of materials
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Does pathology of small venules contribute to cerebral microinfarcts and dementia? / Hartmann, David A.; Hyacinth, Hyacinth I.; Liao, Francesca-Fang; Shih, Andy Y.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 144, No. 5, 01.03.2018, p. 517-526.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Hartmann, David A. ; Hyacinth, Hyacinth I. ; Liao, Francesca-Fang ; Shih, Andy Y. / Does pathology of small venules contribute to cerebral microinfarcts and dementia?. In: Journal of Neurochemistry. 2018 ; Vol. 144, No. 5. pp. 517-526.
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