Does Self-Efficacy Mediate the Relationships Between Social-Cognitive Factors and Intentions to Receive HPV Vaccination Among Young Women?

Shannon Christy, Joseph G. Winger, Catherine E. Mosher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing upon health behavior change theories, the current study examined whether self-efficacy mediated relationships between social-cognitive factors (i.e., perceived risk, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, perceived severity, and cue to action) and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination intentions among college women. Unvaccinated women (N = 115) aged 18 to 25 years attending a Midwestern university completed an anonymous web-based survey assessing study variables. Correlational analyses and mediation analyses were conducted. Self-efficacy mediated relationships between two social-cognitive factors (i.e., perceived barriers to HPV vaccination—indirect effect = −.16, SE =.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [−.31, −.06]—and perceived risk of HPV-related conditions—indirect effect =.16, SE =.09, 95% CI = [.01,.37]) and HPV vaccination intentions but was unrelated to the other three social-cognitive factors. Based on these findings, future research should test whether increasing self-efficacy through education on risk of HPV-related conditions and reducing barriers to HPV vaccination improves vaccine uptake in college women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-725
Number of pages18
JournalClinical Nursing Research
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Self Efficacy
Vaccination
Confidence Intervals
Health Behavior
Cues
Vaccines
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Does Self-Efficacy Mediate the Relationships Between Social-Cognitive Factors and Intentions to Receive HPV Vaccination Among Young Women? / Christy, Shannon; Winger, Joseph G.; Mosher, Catherine E.

In: Clinical Nursing Research, Vol. 28, No. 6, 01.07.2019, p. 708-725.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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