Does "spreading" skin dose by rotating the C-arm during an intervention work?

Alexander Pasciak, A. Kyle Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if C-arm rotation is beneficial for reducing peak skin dose (PSD) in interventional radiology (IR) and, if so, under what circumstances. Materials and Methods: The Monte Carlo method was used to perform ray tracing for detailed analyses of the effect of C-arm rotation on PSD across a range of patient sizes, C-arm configurations, and procedure types. Automatic dose-rate control curves on modern fluoroscopic systems were measured for input into the simulations. Results: Rotating the C-arm to reduce the PSD is in most cases contraindicated and results in increased PSD when the C-arm is rotated from an original posteroanterior projection, in some cases resulting in a PSD increase by a factor of 5 or more. When prophylactic rotation was performed before a procedure, however, and the C-arm was rotated between opposed, distinct oblique angles, substantial reduction in PSD was achieved for patients of any size. Conclusions: Rotating the C-arm during a procedure with the aim of "spreading" dose on the skin of the patient may not result in a reduction in PSD and may increase PSD. However, when used as a prophylactic measure combined with tight x-ray beam collimation, C-arm rotation can be used as a tool to reduce PSD. Tight collimation greatly increases the benefit of C-arm rotation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)443-452
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

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Skin
Monte Carlo Method
Interventional Radiology
X-Rays

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Does "spreading" skin dose by rotating the C-arm during an intervention work? / Pasciak, Alexander; Jones, A. Kyle.

In: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 443-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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