Does the natural diet influence the intestine's ability to regulate glucose absorption?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two fish species (rainbow trout and common carp) that differ in natural diet also exhibit differences in the adaptive flexibility of their intestinal nutrient transport mechanisms in response to changes in dietary nutrient composition. When carp ingested a feed that was 24% glucose by weight, there was an increase in both the intestinal length and rates of nutrient absorption, particularly for glucose, when compared to carp fed an isonitrogenous diet devoid of digestible carbohydrate. As a result, the intestine's uptake capacity (nmol of glucose and proline absorbed per min per g body weight) was higher in carp fed the 24% glucose feed. Due to the greater increase in glucose uptake, the ratio of glucose uptake relative to proline (G/P ratio) was higher in carp fed the 24% glucose. Thus, carp are able to adapt to the quantity, and apparently also to the type, of digestible carbohydrate in the diet. In contrast, glucose uptake by trout was unresponsive to the quantity of dietary carbohydrate. Insted, the elevated glucose paradoxically resulted in a greater uptake capacity for proline and a lower G/P ratio. Hence, the adaptive capabilities of the intestinal nutrient transport processes are matched to the potential variation in the carbohydrate content of the natural diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-688
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic and Environmental Physiology
Volume157
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

Fingerprint

Nutrition
Intestines
glucose
intestines
Carps
diet
Diet
Glucose
carp
Nutrients
carbohydrate
uptake mechanisms
Proline
proline
Food
nutrient transport
nutrient
Carbohydrates
Dietary Carbohydrates
carbohydrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

@article{cf3f99d9673648468a77cc7568bdf63b,
title = "Does the natural diet influence the intestine's ability to regulate glucose absorption?",
abstract = "Two fish species (rainbow trout and common carp) that differ in natural diet also exhibit differences in the adaptive flexibility of their intestinal nutrient transport mechanisms in response to changes in dietary nutrient composition. When carp ingested a feed that was 24{\%} glucose by weight, there was an increase in both the intestinal length and rates of nutrient absorption, particularly for glucose, when compared to carp fed an isonitrogenous diet devoid of digestible carbohydrate. As a result, the intestine's uptake capacity (nmol of glucose and proline absorbed per min per g body weight) was higher in carp fed the 24{\%} glucose feed. Due to the greater increase in glucose uptake, the ratio of glucose uptake relative to proline (G/P ratio) was higher in carp fed the 24{\%} glucose. Thus, carp are able to adapt to the quantity, and apparently also to the type, of digestible carbohydrate in the diet. In contrast, glucose uptake by trout was unresponsive to the quantity of dietary carbohydrate. Insted, the elevated glucose paradoxically resulted in a greater uptake capacity for proline and a lower G/P ratio. Hence, the adaptive capabilities of the intestinal nutrient transport processes are matched to the potential variation in the carbohydrate content of the natural diet.",
author = "Randal Buddington",
year = "1987",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/BF00700989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "157",
pages = "677--688",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology",
issn = "0174-1578",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does the natural diet influence the intestine's ability to regulate glucose absorption?

AU - Buddington, Randal

PY - 1987/1/1

Y1 - 1987/1/1

N2 - Two fish species (rainbow trout and common carp) that differ in natural diet also exhibit differences in the adaptive flexibility of their intestinal nutrient transport mechanisms in response to changes in dietary nutrient composition. When carp ingested a feed that was 24% glucose by weight, there was an increase in both the intestinal length and rates of nutrient absorption, particularly for glucose, when compared to carp fed an isonitrogenous diet devoid of digestible carbohydrate. As a result, the intestine's uptake capacity (nmol of glucose and proline absorbed per min per g body weight) was higher in carp fed the 24% glucose feed. Due to the greater increase in glucose uptake, the ratio of glucose uptake relative to proline (G/P ratio) was higher in carp fed the 24% glucose. Thus, carp are able to adapt to the quantity, and apparently also to the type, of digestible carbohydrate in the diet. In contrast, glucose uptake by trout was unresponsive to the quantity of dietary carbohydrate. Insted, the elevated glucose paradoxically resulted in a greater uptake capacity for proline and a lower G/P ratio. Hence, the adaptive capabilities of the intestinal nutrient transport processes are matched to the potential variation in the carbohydrate content of the natural diet.

AB - Two fish species (rainbow trout and common carp) that differ in natural diet also exhibit differences in the adaptive flexibility of their intestinal nutrient transport mechanisms in response to changes in dietary nutrient composition. When carp ingested a feed that was 24% glucose by weight, there was an increase in both the intestinal length and rates of nutrient absorption, particularly for glucose, when compared to carp fed an isonitrogenous diet devoid of digestible carbohydrate. As a result, the intestine's uptake capacity (nmol of glucose and proline absorbed per min per g body weight) was higher in carp fed the 24% glucose feed. Due to the greater increase in glucose uptake, the ratio of glucose uptake relative to proline (G/P ratio) was higher in carp fed the 24% glucose. Thus, carp are able to adapt to the quantity, and apparently also to the type, of digestible carbohydrate in the diet. In contrast, glucose uptake by trout was unresponsive to the quantity of dietary carbohydrate. Insted, the elevated glucose paradoxically resulted in a greater uptake capacity for proline and a lower G/P ratio. Hence, the adaptive capabilities of the intestinal nutrient transport processes are matched to the potential variation in the carbohydrate content of the natural diet.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023464238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023464238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF00700989

DO - 10.1007/BF00700989

M3 - Article

VL - 157

SP - 677

EP - 688

JO - Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology

JF - Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology

SN - 0174-1578

IS - 5

ER -