Dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) involvement in context-associated fear memory consolidation

Donald F. Siwek, Clifford M. Knapp, Gurcharan Kaur, Subimal Datta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The neurobiological mechanisms of emotional memory processing can be investigated using classical fear conditioning as a model system, and evidence from multiple lines of research suggests that sleep influences consolidation of emotional memory. In rodents, some of this evidence comes from a common finding that sleep deprivation from 0 to 6 h after fear conditioning training impairs processing of conditioned fear memory. Here, we show that during a 6-h session of sleep-wake (S-W) recording, immediately after a session of context-associated fear conditioning training, rats spent more time in wakefulness (W) and less time in slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This context-associated fear conditioning training-induced reduction in SWS lasts for 2 h, and the REM sleep reduction lasts throughout the entire 6-h post-training S-W recording period. Interestingly, these reductions in SWS and REM sleep during this 6-h period did not impair memory consolidation for context-associated fear conditioning. The results of this study show, for the first time, that lesions within the dorsal part of the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD), which were unintentionally caused by the implantation of bipolar recording electrodes, impair consolidation of context-associated fear conditioning memory. Together, the results of these experiments suggest that emotional memory processing associated with fear conditioning can be completed successfully within less than a normal amount of sleep, but it requires a structurally and functionally intact SubCD, an area in the brain stem where phasic pontine wave (P-wave) generating cells are located.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1535-1545
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume232
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Fear
Sleep
REM Sleep
Memory Consolidation
Classical Conditioning
Sleep Deprivation
Wakefulness
Brain Stem
Conditioning (Psychology)
Rodentia
Electrodes
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) involvement in context-associated fear memory consolidation. / Siwek, Donald F.; Knapp, Clifford M.; Kaur, Gurcharan; Datta, Subimal.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 232, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 1535-1545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siwek, Donald F. ; Knapp, Clifford M. ; Kaur, Gurcharan ; Datta, Subimal. / Dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) involvement in context-associated fear memory consolidation. In: Experimental Brain Research. 2014 ; Vol. 232, No. 5. pp. 1535-1545.
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