Drosophila

Rami R. Ajjuri, Marleshia Hall, Lawrence Reiter, Janis M. O'Donnell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been the focus of genetics research for over a century. One consequence of this long history as a genetic model is a remarkably robust and diverse set of genetic tools, including loss of function mutations in most genes, a powerful transgenesis system, whole-genome RNA interference libraries, and expression systems with temporal and spatial specificity. Since approximately 75% of known human disease genes are conserved in Drosophila, these powerful genetic reagents available for Drosophila research are increasingly being applied to human disease research. Relative to the mammalian brain, the fruit fly brain is greatly simplified, yet retains significant complexity, with conserved neurotransmitter systems. These features, coupled with simple, quantitative mobility assays, make the fly a valuable model for movement disorders research. Applications include the investigation of pathogenic mechanisms using either human disease transgenes or Drosophila homologs, genetic modifier screens to detect functionally related genes, and therapeutic drug screens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMovement Disorders
Subtitle of host publicationGenetics and Models: Second Edition
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages77-96
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)9780124051959
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Diptera
Drosophila
Fruit
Research
Genes
Gene Transfer Techniques
Genetic Research
Genetic Models
Movement Disorders
Brain
RNA Interference
Drosophila melanogaster
Transgenes
Libraries
Neurotransmitter Agents
History
Genome
Mutation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ajjuri, R. R., Hall, M., Reiter, L., & O'Donnell, J. M. (2015). Drosophila. In Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition (pp. 77-96). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-405195-9.00005-6

Drosophila. / Ajjuri, Rami R.; Hall, Marleshia; Reiter, Lawrence; O'Donnell, Janis M.

Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2015. p. 77-96.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Ajjuri, RR, Hall, M, Reiter, L & O'Donnell, JM 2015, Drosophila. in Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., pp. 77-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-405195-9.00005-6
Ajjuri RR, Hall M, Reiter L, O'Donnell JM. Drosophila. In Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc. 2015. p. 77-96 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-405195-9.00005-6
Ajjuri, Rami R. ; Hall, Marleshia ; Reiter, Lawrence ; O'Donnell, Janis M. / Drosophila. Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2015. pp. 77-96
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