Drug wanting: Behavioral sensitization and relapse to drug-seeking behavior

Jeffery Steketee, Peter W. Kalivas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

300 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse enhances the motor-stimulant response to these drugs, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. Animals that are extinguished from self-administration training readily relapse to drug, conditioned cue, or stress priming. The involvement of sensitization in reinstated drug-seeking behavior remains controversial. This review describes sensitization and reinstated drug seeking as behavioral events, and the neural circuitry, neurochemistry, and neuropharmacology underlying both behavioral models will be described, compared, and contrasted. It seems that although sensitization and reinstatement involve overlapping circuitry and neurotransmitter and receptor systems, the role of sensitization in reinstatement remains ill-defined. Nevertheless, it is argued that sensitization remains a useful model for determining the neural basis of addiction, and an example is provided in which data from sensitization studies led to potential pharmacotherapies that have been tested in animal models of relapse and in human addicts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-365
Number of pages18
JournalPharmacological Reviews
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

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Drug-Seeking Behavior
Recurrence
Neuropharmacology
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neurochemistry
Neurotransmitter Receptor
Self Administration
Street Drugs
Cues
Animal Models
Drug Therapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Drug wanting : Behavioral sensitization and relapse to drug-seeking behavior. / Steketee, Jeffery; Kalivas, Peter W.

In: Pharmacological Reviews, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.06.2011, p. 348-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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