Dual antiplatelet therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting in the setting of acute coronary syndrome

Ritin Bomb, Carrie S. Oliphant, Rami Khouzam

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After acute coronary syndrome (ACS), dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is the standard of care for both invasive management with percutaneous intervention and noninvasive (medical) management. Conversely, studies using dual antiplatelet in the population of patients presenting with ACS who undergo coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are conflicting. The appropriate antiplatelet regimen after CABG remains an area of controversy. Plaque stability, prevention of graft closure, and secondary thrombosis form the basis for using a second antiplatelet drug, whereas the additional risk of bleeding and lack of conclusive evidence should also be considered. After an extensive literature search, 12 clinical trials with efficacy outcomes were identified. Most of the studies are retrospective, nonrandomized single-center trials. A few large patient populations have been examined using database information. To date, there is only 1 prospective, multicenter, randomized trial published. Recommendations from national guidelines differ, proposing single antiplatelet therapy with aspirin or DAPT with the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel. The purpose of this report is to review the available clinical trial data and provide guidance to practitioners when caring for this patient population. In conclusion, there is no clear consensus regarding the use of DAPT in patients after CABG. If not contraindicated, it is reasonable to use DAPT, starting in the postoperative period, in patients presenting with ACS. Large, multicenter, randomized clinical trials are needed to definitively investigate the role of DAPT in patients with ACS after CABG.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-154
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume116
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Acute Coronary Syndrome
Coronary Artery Bypass
clopidogrel
Aspirin
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials
Population
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Standard of Care
Postoperative Period
Multicenter Studies
Consensus
Thrombosis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Retrospective Studies
Databases
Guidelines
Hemorrhage
Transplants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dual antiplatelet therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting in the setting of acute coronary syndrome. / Bomb, Ritin; Oliphant, Carrie S.; Khouzam, Rami.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 116, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 148-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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