Dual-task effects of spontaneous speech and executive function on gait in aging

Exaggerated effects in slow walkers

Prudence Plummer-D'Amato, Lori J.P. Altmann, Kevin Reilly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared the effects of spontaneous speech and executive function on gait and investigated the effects of single-task gait speed on dual-task costs. Twenty-one older adults (74.7. years, SD 5.9) and 23 younger adults (22. years, SD 1.2) walked for 60. s while performing an auditory Stroop task and a spontaneous speech task; they also performed each task in isolation. Walking while talking significantly reduced gait speed in both groups; however, only older adults experienced significant cognitive-motor interference during the Stroop task. Stride duration variability and gait symmetry were also affected by the speech task in older but not younger adults. Dual-task costs on gait speed were greater in slow-walking older adults than fast walkers. These results demonstrate that spontaneous speech is a highly demanding task that has a profound impact on gait in older adults, especially those with gait speed <1. m/s.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalGait and Posture
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Walkers
Executive Function
Gait
Walking
Young Adult
Costs and Cost Analysis
Walking Speed

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Dual-task effects of spontaneous speech and executive function on gait in aging : Exaggerated effects in slow walkers. / Plummer-D'Amato, Prudence; Altmann, Lori J.P.; Reilly, Kevin.

In: Gait and Posture, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 233-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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