Early postnatal iron repletion overcomes lasting effects of gestational iron deficiency in rats

John L. Beard, Erica L. Unger, Laura E. Bianco, Tessy Paul, Sarah E. Rundle, Byron Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron deficiency anemia in early childhood causes developmental delays and, very likely, irreversible alterations in neurological functioning. One primary goal for the present study was to determine whether the effects of late gestational iron deficiency on brain monoamine metabolism, iron content, and behavioral phenotypes could be repaired with iron intervention in early lactation. Young pregnant rats were provided iron-deficient or control diets from mid-gestation (G15). At postnatal d 4 (P4), pups from iron-deficient dams were out-fostered either to other ID dams or control dams while pups of control dams were similarly fostered to other control dams. Dietary treatments continued to adulthood (P65) when brain iron and regional monoamines were evaluated. P4 iron repletion normalized body iron status, brain iron concentrations, monoamine concentrations, and monoamine transporter and receptor densities in most brain regions. Dopamine transporter densities in caudate and substantia nigra were lower in ID rats but were normalized with iron repletion. Serotonin transporter levels in most brain regions and open-field exploration were also normalized with iron repletion. The success of this approach of early postnatal iron intervention following iron deficiency in utero contrasts to a relative lack of success when the intervention is performed at weaning. These data suggest that a window of opportunity exists for reversing the detrimental effects of iron deficiency in utero in rats and provides strong support of intervention approaches in humans with iron deficiency during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1176-1182
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume137
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

repletion
Iron
iron
rats
monoamines
brain
Brain
transporters
pups
pregnancy
Pregnancy
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
iron deficiency anemia
Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Substantia Nigra
early lactation
Weaning
dopamine
adulthood

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Beard, J. L., Unger, E. L., Bianco, L. E., Paul, T., Rundle, S. E., & Jones, B. (2007). Early postnatal iron repletion overcomes lasting effects of gestational iron deficiency in rats. Journal of Nutrition, 137(5), 1176-1182.

Early postnatal iron repletion overcomes lasting effects of gestational iron deficiency in rats. / Beard, John L.; Unger, Erica L.; Bianco, Laura E.; Paul, Tessy; Rundle, Sarah E.; Jones, Byron.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 137, No. 5, 01.05.2007, p. 1176-1182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beard, JL, Unger, EL, Bianco, LE, Paul, T, Rundle, SE & Jones, B 2007, 'Early postnatal iron repletion overcomes lasting effects of gestational iron deficiency in rats', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 137, no. 5, pp. 1176-1182.
Beard, John L. ; Unger, Erica L. ; Bianco, Laura E. ; Paul, Tessy ; Rundle, Sarah E. ; Jones, Byron. / Early postnatal iron repletion overcomes lasting effects of gestational iron deficiency in rats. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2007 ; Vol. 137, No. 5. pp. 1176-1182.
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