Early results of midline hernia repair using a minimally invasive component separation technique

Sharon L. Bachman, Archana Ramaswamy, Bruce Ramshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A minimally invasive component separation may lead to a dynamic abdominal wall after hernia repair, with reduced complications. We present early results of our patients undergoing this technique. Five patients were selected for open midline repairs; three with chronic infections, one with a prior midline skin graft, and one who desired a primary, tension-free repair. These three males and two females had a mean age of 50.8 ± 21.1 years and body mass index of 30.9 ± 6.2. The mean number of previous abdominal operations was 7 ± 3.4 and previous attempted hernia repairs were 4 ± 2.7. All patients had a midline laparotomy with lysis of adhesions. An endoscopic component separation was then performed bilaterally. Drains were left in the dissection bed. All patients had the midline closed; four received biologic mesh underlays. Mean operative time was 227 minutes ± 49. Mean length of stay (LOS) was 9.2 days ± 3.6. Early median follow-up was 6 months (range 0.25-9). Two patients required postop transfusions, and two patients had mild complications of the midline wound (hematoma, infection). To date, one recurrence was diagnosed by CT scan. Early evaluation of adopting the minimally invasive (MIS) component separation demonstrates minimal complications and good initial outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)572-577
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume75
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Herniorrhaphy
Abdominal Wall
Wound Infection
Operative Time
Hematoma
Laparotomy
Dissection
Length of Stay
Body Mass Index
Transplants
Recurrence
Skin
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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Early results of midline hernia repair using a minimally invasive component separation technique. / Bachman, Sharon L.; Ramaswamy, Archana; Ramshaw, Bruce.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 75, No. 7, 01.07.2009, p. 572-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bachman, Sharon L. ; Ramaswamy, Archana ; Ramshaw, Bruce. / Early results of midline hernia repair using a minimally invasive component separation technique. In: American Surgeon. 2009 ; Vol. 75, No. 7. pp. 572-577.
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