Eccentric and concentric muscle performance in patients with spastic paresis secondary to motor neuron disease. A preliminary report

Judy W. Griffin, Robert E. Tooms, Roger Vander Zwaag, Mary L. O'Toole, Tulio Bertorini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study investigated the potential value of eccentric (ECC) and concentric (CONC) isokinetic testing for quantifying motor deficit in patients with spastic paresis secondary to motor neuron disease. We hypothesized that, at a moderately fast (120° s-1) angular velocity, spastic patients would demonstrate different ECC-CONC torque relationships from healthy controls or patients with non-spastic neuromuscular disorders. Eleven patients with motor neuron disease having clinical evidence of spasticity, and 11 disease-control patients (with non-spastic disorders, e.g. lower motor neuron disease or myopathy) underwent isokinetic testing. One healthy subject was matched to each of the 22 patients. The average torque generated during maximal voluntary ECC and CONC knee flexion (KF) and extension (KE) was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer (Kin-Com). Reliability was established (all ICC≥0.97) for patient torque measurements. Relative strength (% of control subject torque) in spastic patients was significantly higher for ECC than for CONC actions in both KF and KE; conversely, in non-spastic disease-control patients relative strength was not affected by the type of muscle action. The ECC/CONC average torque ratios for KE and KF at 120° s-1 were significantly greater in spastic patients than controls, but did not differ from controls in non-spastic patients. In spastic patients the ECC-CONC imbalances were related to ambulatory dysfunction. In four spastic patients followed with serial testing, the disproportion between ECC and CONC voluntary capacity persisted over time. Isokinetic measurements of ECC and CONC muscle performance can provide reliable and meaningful measurements of muscle performance in patients with upper motor neuron deficits secondary to motor neuron disease, and may be a useful addition in therapeutic trials to isometric testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-138
Number of pages8
JournalNeuromuscular Disorders
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Fingerprint

Motor Neuron Disease
Muscle Spasticity
Paresis
Muscles
Torque
Knee
Motor Neurons
Muscular Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Eccentric and concentric muscle performance in patients with spastic paresis secondary to motor neuron disease. A preliminary report. / Griffin, Judy W.; Tooms, Robert E.; Vander Zwaag, Roger; O'Toole, Mary L.; Bertorini, Tulio.

In: Neuromuscular Disorders, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.01.1994, p. 131-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Griffin, Judy W. ; Tooms, Robert E. ; Vander Zwaag, Roger ; O'Toole, Mary L. ; Bertorini, Tulio. / Eccentric and concentric muscle performance in patients with spastic paresis secondary to motor neuron disease. A preliminary report. In: Neuromuscular Disorders. 1994 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 131-138.
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