Economic burden of cardiovascular disease associated with excess body weight in U.S. adults

Guijing Wang, Zhi Jie Zheng, Gregory Heath, Carol Macera, Mike Pratt, David Buchner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Excess body weight (EBW), which continues to become more prevalent, is a clear contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death and disability among U.S. adults. Information on the economic impact of CVD associated with EBW is lacking, however. Objective: To estimate the direct medical costs of CVD associated with EBW. Methods: We conducted a population-based analysis of direct medical costs by linking the 1995 National Health Interview Survey and the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The study subjects are adults (aged ≥25 years, excluding pregnant women) in the non-institutionalized, civilian population in 1996. Results: The prevalence of CVD among people in the normal weight (body mass index [BMI] ≥18.5 to <25), overweight (BMI ≥25 to <30), and obese (BMI ≥30) groups was 20%, 28%, and 39%, respectively. There were 12.95 million CVD cases among overweight people, more than 25% of which was associated with overweight. There were 9.3 million CVD cases among obese people, of which more than 45% was associated with obesity. This extra disease burden led to $22.17 billion in direct medical costs in 1996 ($31 billion in 2001 dollars, 17% of the total direct medical cost of treating CVD). Conclusions: The strong positive association between EBW and CVD, and the significant economic impact of EBW-associated CVD demonstrate the need to prevent EBW among U.S. adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cost of Illness
Cardiovascular Diseases
Body Weight
Body Mass Index
Costs and Cost Analysis
Economics
Health Expenditures
Health Surveys
Population
Pregnant Women
Cause of Death
Obesity
Interviews
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Economic burden of cardiovascular disease associated with excess body weight in U.S. adults. / Wang, Guijing; Zheng, Zhi Jie; Heath, Gregory; Macera, Carol; Pratt, Mike; Buchner, David.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Guijing ; Zheng, Zhi Jie ; Heath, Gregory ; Macera, Carol ; Pratt, Mike ; Buchner, David. / Economic burden of cardiovascular disease associated with excess body weight in U.S. adults. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 1-6.
@article{d8a877023814452b9989a4010129bb5e,
title = "Economic burden of cardiovascular disease associated with excess body weight in U.S. adults",
abstract = "Background: Excess body weight (EBW), which continues to become more prevalent, is a clear contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death and disability among U.S. adults. Information on the economic impact of CVD associated with EBW is lacking, however. Objective: To estimate the direct medical costs of CVD associated with EBW. Methods: We conducted a population-based analysis of direct medical costs by linking the 1995 National Health Interview Survey and the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The study subjects are adults (aged ≥25 years, excluding pregnant women) in the non-institutionalized, civilian population in 1996. Results: The prevalence of CVD among people in the normal weight (body mass index [BMI] ≥18.5 to <25), overweight (BMI ≥25 to <30), and obese (BMI ≥30) groups was 20{\%}, 28{\%}, and 39{\%}, respectively. There were 12.95 million CVD cases among overweight people, more than 25{\%} of which was associated with overweight. There were 9.3 million CVD cases among obese people, of which more than 45{\%} was associated with obesity. This extra disease burden led to $22.17 billion in direct medical costs in 1996 ($31 billion in 2001 dollars, 17{\%} of the total direct medical cost of treating CVD). Conclusions: The strong positive association between EBW and CVD, and the significant economic impact of EBW-associated CVD demonstrate the need to prevent EBW among U.S. adults.",
author = "Guijing Wang and Zheng, {Zhi Jie} and Gregory Heath and Carol Macera and Mike Pratt and David Buchner",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0749-3797(02)00448-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Economic burden of cardiovascular disease associated with excess body weight in U.S. adults

AU - Wang, Guijing

AU - Zheng, Zhi Jie

AU - Heath, Gregory

AU - Macera, Carol

AU - Pratt, Mike

AU - Buchner, David

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - Background: Excess body weight (EBW), which continues to become more prevalent, is a clear contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death and disability among U.S. adults. Information on the economic impact of CVD associated with EBW is lacking, however. Objective: To estimate the direct medical costs of CVD associated with EBW. Methods: We conducted a population-based analysis of direct medical costs by linking the 1995 National Health Interview Survey and the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The study subjects are adults (aged ≥25 years, excluding pregnant women) in the non-institutionalized, civilian population in 1996. Results: The prevalence of CVD among people in the normal weight (body mass index [BMI] ≥18.5 to <25), overweight (BMI ≥25 to <30), and obese (BMI ≥30) groups was 20%, 28%, and 39%, respectively. There were 12.95 million CVD cases among overweight people, more than 25% of which was associated with overweight. There were 9.3 million CVD cases among obese people, of which more than 45% was associated with obesity. This extra disease burden led to $22.17 billion in direct medical costs in 1996 ($31 billion in 2001 dollars, 17% of the total direct medical cost of treating CVD). Conclusions: The strong positive association between EBW and CVD, and the significant economic impact of EBW-associated CVD demonstrate the need to prevent EBW among U.S. adults.

AB - Background: Excess body weight (EBW), which continues to become more prevalent, is a clear contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death and disability among U.S. adults. Information on the economic impact of CVD associated with EBW is lacking, however. Objective: To estimate the direct medical costs of CVD associated with EBW. Methods: We conducted a population-based analysis of direct medical costs by linking the 1995 National Health Interview Survey and the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The study subjects are adults (aged ≥25 years, excluding pregnant women) in the non-institutionalized, civilian population in 1996. Results: The prevalence of CVD among people in the normal weight (body mass index [BMI] ≥18.5 to <25), overweight (BMI ≥25 to <30), and obese (BMI ≥30) groups was 20%, 28%, and 39%, respectively. There were 12.95 million CVD cases among overweight people, more than 25% of which was associated with overweight. There were 9.3 million CVD cases among obese people, of which more than 45% was associated with obesity. This extra disease burden led to $22.17 billion in direct medical costs in 1996 ($31 billion in 2001 dollars, 17% of the total direct medical cost of treating CVD). Conclusions: The strong positive association between EBW and CVD, and the significant economic impact of EBW-associated CVD demonstrate the need to prevent EBW among U.S. adults.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036293386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036293386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0749-3797(02)00448-8

DO - 10.1016/S0749-3797(02)00448-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 12093416

AN - SCOPUS:0036293386

VL - 23

SP - 1

EP - 6

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 1

ER -