Effect of body weight on dose of Vitamin K antagonists

Timothy H. Self, Jessica L. Wallace, Sami Sakaan, Christopher W. Sands

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Numerous factors are well documented to affect the response to vitamin K antagonists (VKA), including dietary vitamin K, other drugs, age, pharmacogenetics, and disease states. Body weight is perhaps not as well known as a variable affecting VKA dose. Our aim was to review the literature regarding body weight and VKA dose requirements. Methods We reviewed the English-language literature via PubMed and Scopus using the search terms VKA, warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon, fluindione, AND body weight. Results Among 32 studies conducted since the widespread use of the international normalized ratio, 29 found a correlation with body weight or body surface area and VKA dose requirement. Warfarin was evaluated in 27 studies and acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon, or fluindione were assessed in 5 investigations. Conclusions Because of varying study methodologies, further study is warranted. Based on current evidence, clinicians should include body weight, along with other established variables when dosing VKA. Most important, obese and morbidly obese patients may require a 30% to 50% increase with the initial dosing of VKA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)637-643
Number of pages7
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume108
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Vitamin K
Body Weight
Acenocoumarol
Phenprocoumon
Warfarin
International Normalized Ratio
Body Surface Area
Pharmacogenetics
PubMed
Language
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Self, T. H., Wallace, J. L., Sakaan, S., & Sands, C. W. (2015). Effect of body weight on dose of Vitamin K antagonists. Southern Medical Journal, 108(10), 637-643. https://doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000356

Effect of body weight on dose of Vitamin K antagonists. / Self, Timothy H.; Wallace, Jessica L.; Sakaan, Sami; Sands, Christopher W.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 108, No. 10, 01.01.2015, p. 637-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Self, TH, Wallace, JL, Sakaan, S & Sands, CW 2015, 'Effect of body weight on dose of Vitamin K antagonists', Southern Medical Journal, vol. 108, no. 10, pp. 637-643. https://doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000356
Self, Timothy H. ; Wallace, Jessica L. ; Sakaan, Sami ; Sands, Christopher W. / Effect of body weight on dose of Vitamin K antagonists. In: Southern Medical Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 108, No. 10. pp. 637-643.
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