Effect of cannabidiol on human gingival fibroblast extracellular matrix metabolism: MMP production and activity, and production of fibronectin and transforming growth factor β

S. Y. Rawal, M. Kh Dabbous, David Tipton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objective: Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) use may be associated with gingival enlargement, resembling that caused by phenytoin. Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic Cannabis derivative, is structurally similar to phenytoin. While there are many reports on effects of phenytoin on human gingival fibroblasts, there is no information on effects of Cannabis components on these cells. The objective of this study was to determine effects of CBD on human gingival fibroblast fibrogenic and matrix-degrading activities. Material and Methods: Fibroblasts were incubated with CBD in serum-free medium for 1-6d. The effect of CBD on cell viability was determined by measuring activity of a mitochondrial enzyme. The fibrogenic molecule transforming growth factorβ and the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin were measured by ELISA. Pro-MMP-1 and total MMP-2 were measured by ELISA. Activity of MMP-2 was determined via a colorimetric assay in which a detection enzyme is activated by active MMP-2. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. Results: Cannabidiol had little or no significant effect on cell viability. Low CBD concentrations increased transforming growth factorβ production by as much as 40% (p<0.001), while higher concentrations decreased it by as much as 40% (p<0.0001). Cannabidiol increased fibronectin production by as much as approximately 100% (p<0.001). Lower CBD concentrations increased MMP production, but the highest concentrations decreased production of both MMPs (p<0.05) and decreased MMP-2 activity (p<0.02). Conclusion: The data suggest that the CBD may promote fibrotic gingival enlargement by increasing gingival fibroblast production of transforming growth factorβ and fibronectin, while decreasing MMP production and activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)320-329
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Periodontal Research
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

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Cannabidiol
Transforming Growth Factors
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Fibronectins
Extracellular Matrix
Fibroblasts
Cannabis
Phenytoin
Cell Survival
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Serum-Free Culture Media
Enzymes
Cellular Structures
Analysis of Variance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Periodontics

Cite this

@article{3b18cc5558654b7383ef548ec1819797,
title = "Effect of cannabidiol on human gingival fibroblast extracellular matrix metabolism: MMP production and activity, and production of fibronectin and transforming growth factor β",
abstract = "Background and Objective: Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) use may be associated with gingival enlargement, resembling that caused by phenytoin. Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic Cannabis derivative, is structurally similar to phenytoin. While there are many reports on effects of phenytoin on human gingival fibroblasts, there is no information on effects of Cannabis components on these cells. The objective of this study was to determine effects of CBD on human gingival fibroblast fibrogenic and matrix-degrading activities. Material and Methods: Fibroblasts were incubated with CBD in serum-free medium for 1-6d. The effect of CBD on cell viability was determined by measuring activity of a mitochondrial enzyme. The fibrogenic molecule transforming growth factorβ and the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin were measured by ELISA. Pro-MMP-1 and total MMP-2 were measured by ELISA. Activity of MMP-2 was determined via a colorimetric assay in which a detection enzyme is activated by active MMP-2. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. Results: Cannabidiol had little or no significant effect on cell viability. Low CBD concentrations increased transforming growth factorβ production by as much as 40{\%} (p<0.001), while higher concentrations decreased it by as much as 40{\%} (p<0.0001). Cannabidiol increased fibronectin production by as much as approximately 100{\%} (p<0.001). Lower CBD concentrations increased MMP production, but the highest concentrations decreased production of both MMPs (p<0.05) and decreased MMP-2 activity (p<0.02). Conclusion: The data suggest that the CBD may promote fibrotic gingival enlargement by increasing gingival fibroblast production of transforming growth factorβ and fibronectin, while decreasing MMP production and activity.",
author = "Rawal, {S. Y.} and Dabbous, {M. Kh} and David Tipton",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of cannabidiol on human gingival fibroblast extracellular matrix metabolism

T2 - MMP production and activity, and production of fibronectin and transforming growth factor β

AU - Rawal, S. Y.

AU - Dabbous, M. Kh

AU - Tipton, David

PY - 2012/6/1

Y1 - 2012/6/1

N2 - Background and Objective: Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) use may be associated with gingival enlargement, resembling that caused by phenytoin. Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic Cannabis derivative, is structurally similar to phenytoin. While there are many reports on effects of phenytoin on human gingival fibroblasts, there is no information on effects of Cannabis components on these cells. The objective of this study was to determine effects of CBD on human gingival fibroblast fibrogenic and matrix-degrading activities. Material and Methods: Fibroblasts were incubated with CBD in serum-free medium for 1-6d. The effect of CBD on cell viability was determined by measuring activity of a mitochondrial enzyme. The fibrogenic molecule transforming growth factorβ and the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin were measured by ELISA. Pro-MMP-1 and total MMP-2 were measured by ELISA. Activity of MMP-2 was determined via a colorimetric assay in which a detection enzyme is activated by active MMP-2. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. Results: Cannabidiol had little or no significant effect on cell viability. Low CBD concentrations increased transforming growth factorβ production by as much as 40% (p<0.001), while higher concentrations decreased it by as much as 40% (p<0.0001). Cannabidiol increased fibronectin production by as much as approximately 100% (p<0.001). Lower CBD concentrations increased MMP production, but the highest concentrations decreased production of both MMPs (p<0.05) and decreased MMP-2 activity (p<0.02). Conclusion: The data suggest that the CBD may promote fibrotic gingival enlargement by increasing gingival fibroblast production of transforming growth factorβ and fibronectin, while decreasing MMP production and activity.

AB - Background and Objective: Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) use may be associated with gingival enlargement, resembling that caused by phenytoin. Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic Cannabis derivative, is structurally similar to phenytoin. While there are many reports on effects of phenytoin on human gingival fibroblasts, there is no information on effects of Cannabis components on these cells. The objective of this study was to determine effects of CBD on human gingival fibroblast fibrogenic and matrix-degrading activities. Material and Methods: Fibroblasts were incubated with CBD in serum-free medium for 1-6d. The effect of CBD on cell viability was determined by measuring activity of a mitochondrial enzyme. The fibrogenic molecule transforming growth factorβ and the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin were measured by ELISA. Pro-MMP-1 and total MMP-2 were measured by ELISA. Activity of MMP-2 was determined via a colorimetric assay in which a detection enzyme is activated by active MMP-2. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. Results: Cannabidiol had little or no significant effect on cell viability. Low CBD concentrations increased transforming growth factorβ production by as much as 40% (p<0.001), while higher concentrations decreased it by as much as 40% (p<0.0001). Cannabidiol increased fibronectin production by as much as approximately 100% (p<0.001). Lower CBD concentrations increased MMP production, but the highest concentrations decreased production of both MMPs (p<0.05) and decreased MMP-2 activity (p<0.02). Conclusion: The data suggest that the CBD may promote fibrotic gingival enlargement by increasing gingival fibroblast production of transforming growth factorβ and fibronectin, while decreasing MMP production and activity.

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JO - Journal of Periodontal Research

JF - Journal of Periodontal Research

SN - 0022-3484

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